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Asian Pacific Islander Americans for Civic Empowerment (APACE)

Asian Pacific Islander Americans for Civic Empowerment (APACE) works for social and economic justice by transforming our democracy through grassroots political empowerment of the broad API community, sustaining a progressive voice to hold ourselves and our leaders accountable to the people.

County Council District Races

Depending on the county district you live in, you may have the following races on your ballot.

  • Jorge Barón is running to bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    Barón plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate organizations around the region on housing and other issues. He believes the county should address disparities in our communities, from providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change to ensuring that everyone can access public transit. 

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that generates outcomes we do not want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld and Poppe on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Given his particular experience, Barón is probably the most distinct candidate in this race. The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón is a great choice if you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader who will bring new perspectives to the King County Council with a record of coalition building and effective advocacy.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-14

    Jorge Barón is running to bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    Barón plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate organizations around the region on housing and other issues. He believes the county should address disparities in our communities, from providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change to ensuring that everyone can access public transit. 

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that generates outcomes we do not want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld and Poppe on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Given his particular experience, Barón is probably the most distinct candidate in this race. The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón is a great choice if you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader who will bring new perspectives to the King County Council with a record of coalition building and effective advocacy.

  • Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-14

    Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following city races on your ballot.

  • Kim-Khanh Van is running for re-election to Renton City Council, Position 7, where she has served since 2020. After her family escaped Vietnam as refugees and settled in King County, she went on to earn her law degree and become an attorney. Van is now an active member of the community - she volunteers with groups that serve veterans, protect the local environment, and provide legal aid to immigrants. She also is a board member of the Kennydale PTA, where her child attends school, and is the co-founder of AAPI Against Hate.

    On the council, Van allocated pandemic funding to homeownership programs, human services, and small businesses. She advocated for testing for toxic "forever chemicals" in our water systems and denounced the construction of an asphalt plant on the Cedar River. She was also one of only two members of the Renton City Council who voted to maintain the Red Lion Hotel as a source of housing for residents experiencing homelessness. However, unlike her opponent Michael Westgaard, she has not publicly endorsed the Raise the Wage Renton ballot measure to increase the minimum wage. 

    Van cares about police accountability and advocated for $1 million to fund body cameras and mental health navigators. However, she also supported hiring and funding additional police to patrol downtown. Notably, she was not one of the three city council members who signed a letter demanding a less punitive approach to criminal justice. 

    Van has been an outspoken advocate for immigrants and communities of color and has earned impressive support from our partners in this race.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-17

    Kim-Khanh Van

    Kim-Khanh Van is running for re-election to Renton City Council, Position 7, where she has served since 2020. After her family escaped Vietnam as refugees and settled in King County, she went on to earn her law degree and become an attorney.

    Kim-Khanh Van is running for re-election to Renton City Council, Position 7, where she has served since 2020. After her family escaped Vietnam as refugees and settled in King County, she went on to earn her law degree and become an attorney. Van is now an active member of the community - she volunteers with groups that serve veterans, protect the local environment, and provide legal aid to immigrants. She also is a board member of the Kennydale PTA, where her child attends school, and is the co-founder of AAPI Against Hate.

    On the council, Van allocated pandemic funding to homeownership programs, human services, and small businesses. She advocated for testing for toxic "forever chemicals" in our water systems and denounced the construction of an asphalt plant on the Cedar River. She was also one of only two members of the Renton City Council who voted to maintain the Red Lion Hotel as a source of housing for residents experiencing homelessness. However, unlike her opponent Michael Westgaard, she has not publicly endorsed the Raise the Wage Renton ballot measure to increase the minimum wage. 

    Van cares about police accountability and advocated for $1 million to fund body cameras and mental health navigators. However, she also supported hiring and funding additional police to patrol downtown. Notably, she was not one of the three city council members who signed a letter demanding a less punitive approach to criminal justice. 

    Van has been an outspoken advocate for immigrants and communities of color and has earned impressive support from our partners in this race.

    Kim-Khanh Van

    Kim-Khanh Van is running for re-election to Renton City Council, Position 7, where she has served since 2020. After her family escaped Vietnam as refugees and settled in King County, she went on to earn her law degree and become an attorney.

  • Apoyadas Por: APACE, M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, SEIU 775, SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, Teamsters Joint Council 28, Renton Firefighters IAFF Local 864, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to advocate for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Morales has the practical track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-17

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district.

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to advocate for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Morales has the practical track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district.

  • Apoyadas Por: APACE, M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, SEIU Local 925, The Stranger, Teamsters Joint Council 28, The Urbanist, UFCW 3000, Washington Bikes, Washington Education Association PAC, Alliance for Gun Responsibility