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Sage Leaders

Sage Leaders cultivates deep democracy in Washington state by developing Black, Indigenous, and People of Color community leaders for civic and elected leadership. Our long-term goal is to build governments reflective of our communities, with the power to influence, lead, and govern within a Just Transition framework. 

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county council races on your ballot.

  • Current Whatcom County Public Utility District (PUD) Commission president Atul Deshmane is now running for county council. He has a background in electrical and industrial engineering and proudly touts the working farm where he lives with his family. 

    If elected, Deshmane would prioritize increasing the resilience of local infrastructure to adapt to climate change. He points to his record on the PUD as evidence of his experience in improving energy efficiency, protecting our water, advocating for clean energy, and expanding broadband access. Deshmane was one of the authors of "The Big Lift," an ambitious proposal to address the homelessness crisis by declaring a public health emergency and building four villages with 25 tiny homes each. He has also been an outspoken critic of the plan to build a new jail in Whatcom County, including voting against the recent proposal in his role on the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to the county council.

    Last updated: 2023-07-24

    Atul Deshmane

    Current Whatcom County Public Utility District (PUD) Commission president Atul Deshmane is now running for county council. He has a background in electrical and industrial engineering and proudly touts the working farm where he lives with his family. 

    Current Whatcom County Public Utility District (PUD) Commission president Atul Deshmane is now running for county council. He has a background in electrical and industrial engineering and proudly touts the working farm where he lives with his family. 

    If elected, Deshmane would prioritize increasing the resilience of local infrastructure to adapt to climate change. He points to his record on the PUD as evidence of his experience in improving energy efficiency, protecting our water, advocating for clean energy, and expanding broadband access. Deshmane was one of the authors of "The Big Lift," an ambitious proposal to address the homelessness crisis by declaring a public health emergency and building four villages with 25 tiny homes each. He has also been an outspoken critic of the plan to build a new jail in Whatcom County, including voting against the recent proposal in his role on the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to the county council.

    Atul Deshmane

    Current Whatcom County Public Utility District (PUD) Commission president Atul Deshmane is now running for county council. He has a background in electrical and industrial engineering and proudly touts the working farm where he lives with his family. 

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders, The Sierra Club, Mt. Baker Chapter

County Council District Races

Depending on the county district you live in, you may have the following races on your ballot.

  • Jorge Barón is running to bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    Barón plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate organizations around the region on housing and other issues. He believes the county should address disparities in our communities, from providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change to ensuring that everyone can access public transit. 

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that generates outcomes we do not want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld and Poppe on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Given his particular experience, Barón is probably the most distinct candidate in this race. The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón is a great choice if you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader who will bring new perspectives to the King County Council with a record of coalition building and effective advocacy.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Jorge Barón is running to bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    Barón plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate organizations around the region on housing and other issues. He believes the county should address disparities in our communities, from providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change to ensuring that everyone can access public transit. 

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that generates outcomes we do not want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld and Poppe on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Given his particular experience, Barón is probably the most distinct candidate in this race. The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón is a great choice if you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader who will bring new perspectives to the King County Council with a record of coalition building and effective advocacy.

  • Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following city races on your ballot.

  • Osman Salahuddin is running for Position 1 on the Redmond City Council after Councilmember Varisha Khan declined to run for re-election. Salahuddin works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for King County Councilmember Sarah Perry. He is currently on the board of directors for the Muslim Association of Puget Sound and previously served as student body president at the University of Washington. 

    Salahuddin is running to reduce the cost of housing in Redmond and ensure everyone feels safe in their community. If elected, he would improve neighborhood walkability and invest more in affordable housing solutions like the Together Center. In addition, he would work to modernize Redmond's building codes to encourage green construction and promote energy efficiency. 

    Salahuddin is facing two conservative opponents in this race: Paul Stepanov and Nate Niederhausern. Stepanov has founded several technology startups including Virtudesk, which helps businesses outsource customer service and administrative jobs. In 2020, Stepanov supported MAGA Republican Loren Culp for governor. Culp compared gun safety laws to the Holocaust and joined President Trump in seeking to overthrow the will of the people after the 2020 election. 

    Niederhausern works in digital streaming and online learning for corporations. He is active with the Redmond LDS Boy Scout troops, particularly on environmental conservation. Niederhausern appears to be newer to politics. While he will be on the primary ballot himself this year, he has not voted in a primary election in 15 years. In addition, he supported Republican Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign against President Obama. 

    Salahuddin is the clear choice for Redmond City Council, Position 1.

    Last updated: 2023-07-12

    Osman Salahuddin

    Osman Salahuddin is running for Position 1 on the Redmond City Council after Councilmember Varisha Khan declined to run for re-election. Salahuddin works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for King County Councilmember Sarah Perry.

    Osman Salahuddin is running for Position 1 on the Redmond City Council after Councilmember Varisha Khan declined to run for re-election. Salahuddin works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for King County Councilmember Sarah Perry. He is currently on the board of directors for the Muslim Association of Puget Sound and previously served as student body president at the University of Washington. 

    Salahuddin is running to reduce the cost of housing in Redmond and ensure everyone feels safe in their community. If elected, he would improve neighborhood walkability and invest more in affordable housing solutions like the Together Center. In addition, he would work to modernize Redmond's building codes to encourage green construction and promote energy efficiency. 

    Salahuddin is facing two conservative opponents in this race: Paul Stepanov and Nate Niederhausern. Stepanov has founded several technology startups including Virtudesk, which helps businesses outsource customer service and administrative jobs. In 2020, Stepanov supported MAGA Republican Loren Culp for governor. Culp compared gun safety laws to the Holocaust and joined President Trump in seeking to overthrow the will of the people after the 2020 election. 

    Niederhausern works in digital streaming and online learning for corporations. He is active with the Redmond LDS Boy Scout troops, particularly on environmental conservation. Niederhausern appears to be newer to politics. While he will be on the primary ballot himself this year, he has not voted in a primary election in 15 years. In addition, he supported Republican Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign against President Obama. 

    Salahuddin is the clear choice for Redmond City Council, Position 1.

    Osman Salahuddin

    Osman Salahuddin is running for Position 1 on the Redmond City Council after Councilmember Varisha Khan declined to run for re-election. Salahuddin works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for King County Councilmember Sarah Perry.

  • U.S. Navy Veteran and insurance agent Angie Nuevacamina is running for Redmond City Council, Position 7. She serves on the Redmond Planning Commission and has been a committee member with the Boys & Girls Clubs of King County for the last 5 years. 

    Nuevacamina is running to make housing more affordable, keep our communities safe, and improve transparency in local government. As a proponent of the "Nothing About Us Without Us" principle, she would ensure decisions in Redmond are made more equitably and every voice is heard. As Redmond continues to grow, she also wants to make the city more welcoming for all residents. 

    Nuevacamina is facing Amit Gupta and incumbent David Carson. Carson, a software test lead, is a business-oriented candidate running to push for the completion of infrastructure projects in Redmond. Carson has an antagonistic approach to homelessness, stating that he wants to prosecute people found with shopping carts off-premises. He has been cited in the Washington Post and elsewhere stating that those suffering from addiction must hit "rock bottom" before seeking treatment.

    Amit Gupta is running for Redmond City Council, Position 7 with a focus on economic growth and sustainability. He works as a Principal Group Engineering Manager at Microsoft and serves on the Computer Science Advisory Board of Kansas State University, where he earned a graduate degree. While he supports some good policies, he lacks Angie's depth of community leadership experience and detailed knowledge of local policies.

    Nuevacamina's lived experience and deep experience in the community makes her the clear choice for Redmond City Council, Position 7.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Angie Nuevacamina

    U.S. Navy Veteran and insurance agent Angie Nuevacamina is running for Redmond City Council, Position 7. She serves on the Redmond Planning Commission and has been a committee member with the Boys & Girls Clubs of King County for the last 5 years. 

    U.S. Navy Veteran and insurance agent Angie Nuevacamina is running for Redmond City Council, Position 7. She serves on the Redmond Planning Commission and has been a committee member with the Boys & Girls Clubs of King County for the last 5 years. 

    Nuevacamina is running to make housing more affordable, keep our communities safe, and improve transparency in local government. As a proponent of the "Nothing About Us Without Us" principle, she would ensure decisions in Redmond are made more equitably and every voice is heard. As Redmond continues to grow, she also wants to make the city more welcoming for all residents. 

    Nuevacamina is facing Amit Gupta and incumbent David Carson. Carson, a software test lead, is a business-oriented candidate running to push for the completion of infrastructure projects in Redmond. Carson has an antagonistic approach to homelessness, stating that he wants to prosecute people found with shopping carts off-premises. He has been cited in the Washington Post and elsewhere stating that those suffering from addiction must hit "rock bottom" before seeking treatment.

    Amit Gupta is running for Redmond City Council, Position 7 with a focus on economic growth and sustainability. He works as a Principal Group Engineering Manager at Microsoft and serves on the Computer Science Advisory Board of Kansas State University, where he earned a graduate degree. While he supports some good policies, he lacks Angie's depth of community leadership experience and detailed knowledge of local policies.

    Nuevacamina's lived experience and deep experience in the community makes her the clear choice for Redmond City Council, Position 7.

    Angie Nuevacamina

    U.S. Navy Veteran and insurance agent Angie Nuevacamina is running for Redmond City Council, Position 7. She serves on the Redmond Planning Commission and has been a committee member with the Boys & Girls Clubs of King County for the last 5 years. 

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to advocate for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Morales has the practical track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district.

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to advocate for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Morales has the practical track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district.

  • Endorsed By: APACE, M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, SEIU Local 925, The Stranger, Teamsters Joint Council 28, The Urbanist, UFCW 3000, Washington Bikes, Washington Education Association PAC, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. She is a small business owner, former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University, and former Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program. Hollingsworth is currently part of the Food Access Network at Northwest Harvest. She has invested much of her time in community and agriculture. Her family owns and operates one of the few Black-owned cannabis production farms in the state.

    In our interview with Hollingsworth, she pointed to her lifelong history and knowledge of the district as a strength. Though she does not have extensive policy experience, she would bring a wealth of community knowledge and priorities to the seat. For example, she spoke about how Black-owned businesses in the Central District had long been overlooked. She would push for greater investments from Seattle’s Business Improvement Areas and Office of Economic Development. She pointed out that the 98118 zip code in Rainier Valley only had one food bank, which hampered residents' ability to put food on the table in difficult times. She would also seek more youth enrichment programs and equitable placement of parks and green spaces by looking for opportunities for both in the district.

    Compared to Hudson's campaign, Hollingsworth's is more locally focused, with a desire to improve youth activities and parks specifically in the district. When it comes to policing, she stated that police should make more of an effort to meet the community, a stance we feel could use more detail.  She also supports Mayor Harrell's plan to hire 400 more cops, which will likely prove challenging during a nationwide shortage of officers and would do little to address the root causes of crime. 

    Hollingsworth would be an excellent choice for voters looking for a candidate with strong community ties who would be a powerful advocate for District 3 at city hall.

    Last updated: 2023-07-20

    Joy Hollingsworth

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. She is a small business owner, former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University, and former Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program.

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. She is a small business owner, former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University, and former Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program. Hollingsworth is currently part of the Food Access Network at Northwest Harvest. She has invested much of her time in community and agriculture. Her family owns and operates one of the few Black-owned cannabis production farms in the state.

    In our interview with Hollingsworth, she pointed to her lifelong history and knowledge of the district as a strength. Though she does not have extensive policy experience, she would bring a wealth of community knowledge and priorities to the seat. For example, she spoke about how Black-owned businesses in the Central District had long been overlooked. She would push for greater investments from Seattle’s Business Improvement Areas and Office of Economic Development. She pointed out that the 98118 zip code in Rainier Valley only had one food bank, which hampered residents' ability to put food on the table in difficult times. She would also seek more youth enrichment programs and equitable placement of parks and green spaces by looking for opportunities for both in the district.

    Compared to Hudson's campaign, Hollingsworth's is more locally focused, with a desire to improve youth activities and parks specifically in the district. When it comes to policing, she stated that police should make more of an effort to meet the community, a stance we feel could use more detail.  She also supports Mayor Harrell's plan to hire 400 more cops, which will likely prove challenging during a nationwide shortage of officers and would do little to address the root causes of crime. 

    Hollingsworth would be an excellent choice for voters looking for a candidate with strong community ties who would be a powerful advocate for District 3 at city hall.

    Joy Hollingsworth

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. She is a small business owner, former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University, and former Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program.

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders, UFCW 3000
  • Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program. She also serves as the advocacy chair on John Rogers Elementary's PTA and volunteered to coach middle schoolers who were learning English. As a daughter of Iranian immigrants who were undocumented during her childhood, Jenks is motivated to improve life for immigrant families in a sanctuary city like Seattle.

    Jenks' main area of advocacy has been gun safety. After the Parkland school shooting, she helped organize a gun buyback program and education campaign for gun owners in California, where she lived at the time.

    When it comes to public safety more broadly, Jenks' vision includes safety for everyone - from kids walking and biking to school, to people who live in tents and cars. She supports funding programs like LEAD and CoLEAD that provide behavioral health and community support as an alternative to police. While she does not support the mayor's proposed goal of reaching 1,400 officers, she said in her interview that she would support 1,200. She reportedly said it was a mistake for the previous council to commit to defunding police by 50%.

    When it comes to housing, Jenks thinks the current mandatory affordable housing model does not go far enough, as most landlords can choose to pay a fee instead of creating affordable units. Jenks wants to expand mandatory affordable housing into more neighborhoods and increase zoning and incentives for multi-family homes, which will provide more options for lower and mid-income families. She knocked on doors for the social housing initiative and says she is excited to hear about ideas for how to fund it with progressive revenue. She also mentioned racial justice when it comes to housing - proposing support to help people of color buy homes or afford childcare as a form of reparations.

    Jenks is also passionate about protecting our climate. She wants to bring carbon-free electrification, higher standards for green buildings, and expanded public transit to our neighborhoods. Many of the changes in her climate plan will also make our neighborhoods more walkable, and give residents in Lake City and Bitter Lake an easier commute to the light rail.

    Although some of the other candidates have slightly more ambitious plans for housing and police reform, Jenks has a strong platform and has earned the most progressive endorsements in this race. We recommend Nilu Jenks for Seattle City Council from District 5.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Nilu Jenks

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program.

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program. She also serves as the advocacy chair on John Rogers Elementary's PTA and volunteered to coach middle schoolers who were learning English. As a daughter of Iranian immigrants who were undocumented during her childhood, Jenks is motivated to improve life for immigrant families in a sanctuary city like Seattle.

    Jenks' main area of advocacy has been gun safety. After the Parkland school shooting, she helped organize a gun buyback program and education campaign for gun owners in California, where she lived at the time.

    When it comes to public safety more broadly, Jenks' vision includes safety for everyone - from kids walking and biking to school, to people who live in tents and cars. She supports funding programs like LEAD and CoLEAD that provide behavioral health and community support as an alternative to police. While she does not support the mayor's proposed goal of reaching 1,400 officers, she said in her interview that she would support 1,200. She reportedly said it was a mistake for the previous council to commit to defunding police by 50%.

    When it comes to housing, Jenks thinks the current mandatory affordable housing model does not go far enough, as most landlords can choose to pay a fee instead of creating affordable units. Jenks wants to expand mandatory affordable housing into more neighborhoods and increase zoning and incentives for multi-family homes, which will provide more options for lower and mid-income families. She knocked on doors for the social housing initiative and says she is excited to hear about ideas for how to fund it with progressive revenue. She also mentioned racial justice when it comes to housing - proposing support to help people of color buy homes or afford childcare as a form of reparations.

    Jenks is also passionate about protecting our climate. She wants to bring carbon-free electrification, higher standards for green buildings, and expanded public transit to our neighborhoods. Many of the changes in her climate plan will also make our neighborhoods more walkable, and give residents in Lake City and Bitter Lake an easier commute to the light rail.

    Although some of the other candidates have slightly more ambitious plans for housing and police reform, Jenks has a strong platform and has earned the most progressive endorsements in this race. We recommend Nilu Jenks for Seattle City Council from District 5.

    Nilu Jenks

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program.

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, Teamsters Joint Council 28, The Urbanist, UFCW 3000, King County Democrats
  • Tye Reed

    Tye Reed is the operations director at Real Change News and the co-founder (and current co-chair) of the House Our Neighbors coalition.

    Tye Reed

    Tye Reed is the operations director at Real Change News and the co-founder (and current co-chair) of the House Our Neighbors coalition.

    Tye Reed

    Tye Reed is the operations director at Real Change News and the co-founder (and current co-chair) of the House Our Neighbors coalition.

    Tye Reed

    Tye Reed is the operations director at Real Change News and the co-founder (and current co-chair) of the House Our Neighbors coalition.

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders
  • Esteban Herevia is running for Spokane City Council to bring a vision of joy and safety for all residents to city hall. He is currently the strategist for health justice and belonging at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. Until recently, he was also president and CEO of Spokane Pride, the organization which holds the annual Spokane Pride festival.

    Herevia explained his vision for a Spokane where everyone is thriving and welcome in his local Fuse questionnaire. Herevia became homeless in his youth after his family inflicted violence on him when he came out to them. This has informed his views on homelessness as a candidate. He knows that many living on the streets today are community members who have suffered bad luck or economic misfortune. If elected, he plans to embrace more affordable housing to ensure the dignity of all who live in Spokane. Specifically, he would prioritize ensuring any new developments have 30 percent affordable housing and supports multiple types of zoning to maximize the types of housing available.

    On the issue of public safety, Herevia would empower the police ombudsman to independently investigate police misconduct, including the police chief's alleged preferential treatment of wealthy business owners. He also believes that in the upcoming contract negotiation, the city must emphasize unarmed officers for nonviolent calls and having mental health professionals attend relevant 911 calls alongside police.

    Herevia recently faced an accusation of improper conduct with a student while he was an employee at Whitworth University. The Spokesman-Review published a detailed story that presents both sides of the issue, including transcripts of their text message conversations, which you can read here.

    Herevia would be a strong advocate for marginalized communities and equality for all in Spokane.

    Last updated: 2023-07-11

    Esteban Herevia

    Esteban Herevia is running for Spokane City Council to bring a vision of joy and safety for all residents to city hall. He is currently the strategist for health justice and belonging at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

    Esteban Herevia is running for Spokane City Council to bring a vision of joy and safety for all residents to city hall. He is currently the strategist for health justice and belonging at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. Until recently, he was also president and CEO of Spokane Pride, the organization which holds the annual Spokane Pride festival.

    Herevia explained his vision for a Spokane where everyone is thriving and welcome in his local Fuse questionnaire. Herevia became homeless in his youth after his family inflicted violence on him when he came out to them. This has informed his views on homelessness as a candidate. He knows that many living on the streets today are community members who have suffered bad luck or economic misfortune. If elected, he plans to embrace more affordable housing to ensure the dignity of all who live in Spokane. Specifically, he would prioritize ensuring any new developments have 30 percent affordable housing and supports multiple types of zoning to maximize the types of housing available.

    On the issue of public safety, Herevia would empower the police ombudsman to independently investigate police misconduct, including the police chief's alleged preferential treatment of wealthy business owners. He also believes that in the upcoming contract negotiation, the city must emphasize unarmed officers for nonviolent calls and having mental health professionals attend relevant 911 calls alongside police.

    Herevia recently faced an accusation of improper conduct with a student while he was an employee at Whitworth University. The Spokesman-Review published a detailed story that presents both sides of the issue, including transcripts of their text message conversations, which you can read here.

    Herevia would be a strong advocate for marginalized communities and equality for all in Spokane.

    Esteban Herevia

    Esteban Herevia is running for Spokane City Council to bring a vision of joy and safety for all residents to city hall. He is currently the strategist for health justice and belonging at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, UFCW 3000, Washington Conservation Action, Spokane Regional Labor Council, Washington Education Association PAC
  • Jamika Scott is running for Tacoma City Council from District 3. She previously ran against Mayor Victoria Woodards in 2021 but lost in the primary election. 

    Scott has worked as a domestic violence advocate at YWCA Pierce County and mentored students with AmeriCorps at Peace Community Center. She is also a co-founder and organizer with the Tacoma Action Collective and a board member with the Tacoma Public Library Foundation Board of Directors. Since her run for mayor, she joined the Tacoma Public Library Foundation board and the Tacoma Arts Commission. 

    Scott is running to bring her lifetime of experience in community activism to the Tacoma City Council. If elected, she would prioritize improving community safety through alternatives to law enforcement. She wants to expand access to mental health advocates to respond to emergency calls instead of police. In addition, she supports utilizing a restorative justice model that attempts to repair the harm done instead of only punishing offenders. 

    Scott is a good choice for Tacoma City Council in District 3 if you're looking for a very progressive candidate with deep roots in the community.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Jamika Scott

    Jamika Scott is running for Tacoma City Council from District 3. She previously ran against Mayor Victoria Woodards in 2021 but lost in the primary election. 

    Jamika Scott is running for Tacoma City Council from District 3. She previously ran against Mayor Victoria Woodards in 2021 but lost in the primary election. 

    Scott has worked as a domestic violence advocate at YWCA Pierce County and mentored students with AmeriCorps at Peace Community Center. She is also a co-founder and organizer with the Tacoma Action Collective and a board member with the Tacoma Public Library Foundation Board of Directors. Since her run for mayor, she joined the Tacoma Public Library Foundation board and the Tacoma Arts Commission. 

    Scott is running to bring her lifetime of experience in community activism to the Tacoma City Council. If elected, she would prioritize improving community safety through alternatives to law enforcement. She wants to expand access to mental health advocates to respond to emergency calls instead of police. In addition, she supports utilizing a restorative justice model that attempts to repair the harm done instead of only punishing offenders. 

    Scott is a good choice for Tacoma City Council in District 3 if you're looking for a very progressive candidate with deep roots in the community.

    Jamika Scott

    Jamika Scott is running for Tacoma City Council from District 3. She previously ran against Mayor Victoria Woodards in 2021 but lost in the primary election.