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The Urbanist was founded in early 2014 in order to examine and influence urban policies. We believe that cities provide unique opportunities for addressing many of the most difficult problems we face. Our website serves as a resource for sharing ideas, creating community, and improving the places we live.

County Council District Races

Depending on the county district you live in, you may have the following races on your ballot.

  • King County Budget Manager Becka Johnson Poppe is running to put her budgetary skills and experience to work for the King County Council. She has worked as the UW Director of Policy, Planning & State Operations and as a Budget & Policy Manager with King County. Like Reyneveld, Poppe has held many volunteer roles in the community as well, including as director on the board of youth homelessness advocacy organization YouthCare and serving as a precinct committee officer with the 36th District Democrats.

    Poppe's top three priorities are the environment, equity, and the economy. In our interview with Poppe, she spoke in depth about her work to help oversee half of King County’s $16 billion budget to meet ambitious equity and climate goals. She also said that she would oppose criminalizing homelessness, instead advocating for the houseless as one of the many types of people left behind in the region's uneven prosperity boom. Poppe supports social housing and providing support for first-time homebuyers through a housing levy. 

    Like Baron and Reyneveld, Poppe agreed that the county should seek more mental and behavioral health infrastructure and investments in community courts and other criminal legal alternatives. She said her biggest accomplishment was the development of the county's first-ever Climate Equity Bond, which brought $20 million to frontline communities. 

    Poppe emphasized the environment during her interview. Her plan includes additional investment in accessible, emissions-free transportation like electrifying and expanding the county’s bus and vehicle fleet, providing more green spaces, and working on climate justice in communities most impacted by climate change. She was the only candidate to mention fare-free Metro, both as a way to curb spending on fare enforcement and encourage more riders. Poppe is a good choice If you're looking for a candidate with experience managing large budgets who will prioritize environmental issues.

    Last updated: 2023-07-25

    Becka Johnson Poppe

    King County Budget Manager Becka Johnson Poppe is running to put her budgetary skills and experience to work for the King County Council. She has worked as the UW Director of Policy, Planning & State Operations and as a Budget & Policy Manager with King County.

    King County Budget Manager Becka Johnson Poppe is running to put her budgetary skills and experience to work for the King County Council. She has worked as the UW Director of Policy, Planning & State Operations and as a Budget & Policy Manager with King County. Like Reyneveld, Poppe has held many volunteer roles in the community as well, including as director on the board of youth homelessness advocacy organization YouthCare and serving as a precinct committee officer with the 36th District Democrats.

    Poppe's top three priorities are the environment, equity, and the economy. In our interview with Poppe, she spoke in depth about her work to help oversee half of King County’s $16 billion budget to meet ambitious equity and climate goals. She also said that she would oppose criminalizing homelessness, instead advocating for the houseless as one of the many types of people left behind in the region's uneven prosperity boom. Poppe supports social housing and providing support for first-time homebuyers through a housing levy. 

    Like Baron and Reyneveld, Poppe agreed that the county should seek more mental and behavioral health infrastructure and investments in community courts and other criminal legal alternatives. She said her biggest accomplishment was the development of the county's first-ever Climate Equity Bond, which brought $20 million to frontline communities. 

    Poppe emphasized the environment during her interview. Her plan includes additional investment in accessible, emissions-free transportation like electrifying and expanding the county’s bus and vehicle fleet, providing more green spaces, and working on climate justice in communities most impacted by climate change. She was the only candidate to mention fare-free Metro, both as a way to curb spending on fare enforcement and encourage more riders. Poppe is a good choice If you're looking for a candidate with experience managing large budgets who will prioritize environmental issues.

    Becka Johnson Poppe

    King County Budget Manager Becka Johnson Poppe is running to put her budgetary skills and experience to work for the King County Council. She has worked as the UW Director of Policy, Planning & State Operations and as a Budget & Policy Manager with King County.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, The Urbanist, SW Mountain States Regional Council of Carpenters
  • Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below races on your ballot.

  • Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016. With his science background, Felleman has pledged to continue supporting environmentally friendly reforms at the port.

    In his time as commissioner, Felleman has focused on fighting climate change and increasing the port's green energy jobs. He has been a leader on the commission when it comes to protecting orcas, publicly opposing the dangerous Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and advocating for well-paying jobs. Elected commission president in 2021, he has recently supported more efficient and greener policies at the port to reduce pollution, including adding solar panels to Fishermen's Terminal's net shed and powering new docks so that ships don't have to idle and burn additional fuel.

    Felleman often supports social causes as well, including condemning Trump's Muslim ban and government agencies’ response at the airport, as well as welcoming Ukranian refugees, with Washington hosting 16,000 refugees, the third most of any state in the U.S.

    Felleman has earned your vote for Port of Seatle, Position #5.

    Last updated: 2023-07-13

    Fred Felleman

    Submitted by stephanie on

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016.

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016. With his science background, Felleman has pledged to continue supporting environmentally friendly reforms at the port.

    In his time as commissioner, Felleman has focused on fighting climate change and increasing the port's green energy jobs. He has been a leader on the commission when it comes to protecting orcas, publicly opposing the dangerous Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and advocating for well-paying jobs. Elected commission president in 2021, he has recently supported more efficient and greener policies at the port to reduce pollution, including adding solar panels to Fishermen's Terminal's net shed and powering new docks so that ships don't have to idle and burn additional fuel.

    Felleman often supports social causes as well, including condemning Trump's Muslim ban and government agencies’ response at the airport, as well as welcoming Ukranian refugees, with Washington hosting 16,000 refugees, the third most of any state in the U.S.

    Felleman has earned your vote for Port of Seatle, Position #5.

    Fred Felleman

    Submitted by stephanie on

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following city races on your ballot.

  • Maren Costa is the leading progressive candidate running to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan at Amazon that eventually became their official Climate Pledge. In 2020, Costa was illegally fired from the company after sending out an email to rally her coworkers around poor warehouse conditions for workers. With the backing of an open letter from nine U.S. senators, including Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, Costa won her case against Amazon and continued advocating for workers and her community.

    Costa is now running to bring her tenacity and experience in management to city hall. In our interview with Costa, she spoke about the importance of raising more money to maintain services as the city faces a $100 million budget shortfall. Her proposals, including a vacancy tax, were squarely aimed at making the wealthiest pay what they owe to our communities. 

    Costa wants to look out for working people and make Seattle more livable for all. She spoke to a desire to improve affordability by allowing more mixed-use developments and “four floors and corner stores” in neighborhoods. She believes well-designed, denser neighborhoods are critical as the state faces a severe housing shortage, making living here hard for teachers, nurses, and other working professionals. On homelessness, Costa wants the city to take a housing-first approach, working on getting people into secure housing instead of criminalizing them for sleeping outside. On public safety, Costa offers a vision that funds gun violence prevention, community policing, and alternative response models. 

    Costa's experience managing million-dollar budgets and successfully advocating for corporate climate action makes her stand out as a progressive among the top candidates in the district. That experience plus an impressive set of endorsements make her the best choice for Seattle City Council in District 1.

    Last updated: 2023-07-13

    Maren Costa

    Maren Costa is the leading progressive candidate running to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan at Amazon that eventually became their official Climate Pledge.

    Maren Costa is the leading progressive candidate running to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan at Amazon that eventually became their official Climate Pledge. In 2020, Costa was illegally fired from the company after sending out an email to rally her coworkers around poor warehouse conditions for workers. With the backing of an open letter from nine U.S. senators, including Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, Costa won her case against Amazon and continued advocating for workers and her community.

    Costa is now running to bring her tenacity and experience in management to city hall. In our interview with Costa, she spoke about the importance of raising more money to maintain services as the city faces a $100 million budget shortfall. Her proposals, including a vacancy tax, were squarely aimed at making the wealthiest pay what they owe to our communities. 

    Costa wants to look out for working people and make Seattle more livable for all. She spoke to a desire to improve affordability by allowing more mixed-use developments and “four floors and corner stores” in neighborhoods. She believes well-designed, denser neighborhoods are critical as the state faces a severe housing shortage, making living here hard for teachers, nurses, and other working professionals. On homelessness, Costa wants the city to take a housing-first approach, working on getting people into secure housing instead of criminalizing them for sleeping outside. On public safety, Costa offers a vision that funds gun violence prevention, community policing, and alternative response models. 

    Costa's experience managing million-dollar budgets and successfully advocating for corporate climate action makes her stand out as a progressive among the top candidates in the district. That experience plus an impressive set of endorsements make her the best choice for Seattle City Council in District 1.

    Maren Costa

    Maren Costa is the leading progressive candidate running to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan at Amazon that eventually became their official Climate Pledge.

  • Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to advocate for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Morales has the practical track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district.

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to advocate for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Morales has the practical track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district.

  • Endorsed By: APACE, M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, SEIU Local 925, The Stranger, Teamsters Joint Council 28, The Urbanist, UFCW 3000, Washington Bikes, Washington Education Association PAC, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Alex Hudson is running to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing. Since 2018, she has served as Executive Director of the Transportation Choices Coalition, where she successfully advocated for $5 billion in investments in transportation and transit in the 2022 state legislative session, including ushering in free rides for all youth in Washington. Hudson currently serves on Puget Sound Regional Council Transportation Policy Board and the board of the Freeway Park Association and has also led the First Hill Improvement Association.

    In our interview with Hudson, she offered her perspective as a renter and presented a detailed vision for the city that she hopes would alleviate the housing crisis. In comparison to Hollingsworth, Hudson was very specific in our interview about policies that she believes will affect housing across the entire city, not just the district. As a board member of Bellwether Housing, the largest affordable housing provider in King County, Hudson spoke to how they needed two years to get through permitting, licensing, and review to build housing - not fast enough, in her opinion. Hudson opposes the urban village model and exclusionary zoning, two policies that limit housing and stifle affordable and middle housing, like duplexes, in wealthier neighborhoods. She supports a municipal capital gains tax to invest more in affordable housing and implement the social housing authority to kickstart social, publicly-owned housing in Seattle.

    On community safety and policing, Hudson believes that after one of the greatest civil rights protests of our time, the city has dropped the ball on how to continue to make our communities safe for all. Like Hollingsworth, Hudson sees value in covering some of the basics - making sure street lights work and parks are full of programs and opportunities. In addition, she wants to ensure that armed officers are showing up only on appropriate calls and that fare enforcement is restricted so that people don't end up in the criminal legal system over a bus fare. Hudson also wants to see further investment in a functioning 911 alternative responder. It is worth noting here that both Hudson and Hollingsworth answered 'maybe' to The Seattle Times' questionnaire about conducting sweeps and raising the JumpStart tax on big corporations to cover Seattle's budget shortfall of about $100 million.

    Hudson would be an excellent choice for voters seeking a highly knowledgeable and experienced leader in transportation and housing issues.

    Last updated: 2023-07-20

    Alex Hudson

    Alex Hudson is running to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing.

    Alex Hudson is running to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing. Since 2018, she has served as Executive Director of the Transportation Choices Coalition, where she successfully advocated for $5 billion in investments in transportation and transit in the 2022 state legislative session, including ushering in free rides for all youth in Washington. Hudson currently serves on Puget Sound Regional Council Transportation Policy Board and the board of the Freeway Park Association and has also led the First Hill Improvement Association.

    In our interview with Hudson, she offered her perspective as a renter and presented a detailed vision for the city that she hopes would alleviate the housing crisis. In comparison to Hollingsworth, Hudson was very specific in our interview about policies that she believes will affect housing across the entire city, not just the district. As a board member of Bellwether Housing, the largest affordable housing provider in King County, Hudson spoke to how they needed two years to get through permitting, licensing, and review to build housing - not fast enough, in her opinion. Hudson opposes the urban village model and exclusionary zoning, two policies that limit housing and stifle affordable and middle housing, like duplexes, in wealthier neighborhoods. She supports a municipal capital gains tax to invest more in affordable housing and implement the social housing authority to kickstart social, publicly-owned housing in Seattle.

    On community safety and policing, Hudson believes that after one of the greatest civil rights protests of our time, the city has dropped the ball on how to continue to make our communities safe for all. Like Hollingsworth, Hudson sees value in covering some of the basics - making sure street lights work and parks are full of programs and opportunities. In addition, she wants to ensure that armed officers are showing up only on appropriate calls and that fare enforcement is restricted so that people don't end up in the criminal legal system over a bus fare. Hudson also wants to see further investment in a functioning 911 alternative responder. It is worth noting here that both Hudson and Hollingsworth answered 'maybe' to The Seattle Times' questionnaire about conducting sweeps and raising the JumpStart tax on big corporations to cover Seattle's budget shortfall of about $100 million.

    Hudson would be an excellent choice for voters seeking a highly knowledgeable and experienced leader in transportation and housing issues.

    Alex Hudson

    Alex Hudson is running to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing.

  • Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive advocate for affordable housing, community safety, and more. Davis served on the Roosevelt Neighborhood Association and has been a board member at Futurewise, which advocates for sustainability and livable communities. In our interview with Davis, he emphasized that he's running to be the opposite of retiring incumbent council member Alex Pedersen, who stood in the way of many progressive policies, including efforts to build more "missing middle" housing.

    Davis would focus on housing supply, subsidizing housing so that everyone has more affordable access, and increasing stability for renters. Many policies are on the table for Davis to achieve this, including prohibiting rent price gouging, funding social housing, expanding mid-rise housing, ensuring the "right to return" for people displaced by developers, and offering square footage and height bonuses. Davis is also rigorously pro-science when it comes to treating homelessness as a housing problem. He points out that many challenging and displacing life events like domestic abuse, addiction, and job loss are less catastrophic when people can afford rent and stay off the streets. Aside from the many housing policies above, Davis would push to build 3,500 permanent supportive housing units. 

    Davis is one of the few candidates - not just in the district, but citywide - to acknowledge that even Seattle's own police don't think they can hire 400 more officers during a nationwide shortage. Rather than lowering standards on hires and pouring more money into bonuses, he wants to see aggressive expansion into alternatives to policing for people in crisis. Other top priorities for Davis are worker's rights, including subsidized childcare, closing minimum wage loopholes, and more.

    Vote for Ron Davis for progressive change on the Seattle City Council from District 4.

    Last updated: 2023-07-13

    Ron Davis

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive advocate for affordable housing, community safety, and more.

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive advocate for affordable housing, community safety, and more. Davis served on the Roosevelt Neighborhood Association and has been a board member at Futurewise, which advocates for sustainability and livable communities. In our interview with Davis, he emphasized that he's running to be the opposite of retiring incumbent council member Alex Pedersen, who stood in the way of many progressive policies, including efforts to build more "missing middle" housing.

    Davis would focus on housing supply, subsidizing housing so that everyone has more affordable access, and increasing stability for renters. Many policies are on the table for Davis to achieve this, including prohibiting rent price gouging, funding social housing, expanding mid-rise housing, ensuring the "right to return" for people displaced by developers, and offering square footage and height bonuses. Davis is also rigorously pro-science when it comes to treating homelessness as a housing problem. He points out that many challenging and displacing life events like domestic abuse, addiction, and job loss are less catastrophic when people can afford rent and stay off the streets. Aside from the many housing policies above, Davis would push to build 3,500 permanent supportive housing units. 

    Davis is one of the few candidates - not just in the district, but citywide - to acknowledge that even Seattle's own police don't think they can hire 400 more officers during a nationwide shortage. Rather than lowering standards on hires and pouring more money into bonuses, he wants to see aggressive expansion into alternatives to policing for people in crisis. Other top priorities for Davis are worker's rights, including subsidized childcare, closing minimum wage loopholes, and more.

    Vote for Ron Davis for progressive change on the Seattle City Council from District 4.

    Ron Davis

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive advocate for affordable housing, community safety, and more.

  • Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program. She also serves as the advocacy chair on John Rogers Elementary's PTA and volunteered to coach middle schoolers who were learning English. As a daughter of Iranian immigrants who were undocumented during her childhood, Jenks is motivated to improve life for immigrant families in a sanctuary city like Seattle.

    Jenks' main area of advocacy has been gun safety. After the Parkland school shooting, she helped organize a gun buyback program and education campaign for gun owners in California, where she lived at the time.

    When it comes to public safety more broadly, Jenks' vision includes safety for everyone - from kids walking and biking to school, to people who live in tents and cars. She supports funding programs like LEAD and CoLEAD that provide behavioral health and community support as an alternative to police. While she does not support the mayor's proposed goal of reaching 1,400 officers, she said in her interview that she would support 1,200. She reportedly said it was a mistake for the previous council to commit to defunding police by 50%.

    When it comes to housing, Jenks thinks the current mandatory affordable housing model does not go far enough, as most landlords can choose to pay a fee instead of creating affordable units. Jenks wants to expand mandatory affordable housing into more neighborhoods and increase zoning and incentives for multi-family homes, which will provide more options for lower and mid-income families. She knocked on doors for the social housing initiative and says she is excited to hear about ideas for how to fund it with progressive revenue. She also mentioned racial justice when it comes to housing - proposing support to help people of color buy homes or afford childcare as a form of reparations.

    Jenks is also passionate about protecting our climate. She wants to bring carbon-free electrification, higher standards for green buildings, and expanded public transit to our neighborhoods. Many of the changes in her climate plan will also make our neighborhoods more walkable, and give residents in Lake City and Bitter Lake an easier commute to the light rail.

    Although some of the other candidates have slightly more ambitious plans for housing and police reform, Jenks has a strong platform and has earned the most progressive endorsements in this race. We recommend Nilu Jenks for Seattle City Council from District 5.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Nilu Jenks

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program.

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program. She also serves as the advocacy chair on John Rogers Elementary's PTA and volunteered to coach middle schoolers who were learning English. As a daughter of Iranian immigrants who were undocumented during her childhood, Jenks is motivated to improve life for immigrant families in a sanctuary city like Seattle.

    Jenks' main area of advocacy has been gun safety. After the Parkland school shooting, she helped organize a gun buyback program and education campaign for gun owners in California, where she lived at the time.

    When it comes to public safety more broadly, Jenks' vision includes safety for everyone - from kids walking and biking to school, to people who live in tents and cars. She supports funding programs like LEAD and CoLEAD that provide behavioral health and community support as an alternative to police. While she does not support the mayor's proposed goal of reaching 1,400 officers, she said in her interview that she would support 1,200. She reportedly said it was a mistake for the previous council to commit to defunding police by 50%.

    When it comes to housing, Jenks thinks the current mandatory affordable housing model does not go far enough, as most landlords can choose to pay a fee instead of creating affordable units. Jenks wants to expand mandatory affordable housing into more neighborhoods and increase zoning and incentives for multi-family homes, which will provide more options for lower and mid-income families. She knocked on doors for the social housing initiative and says she is excited to hear about ideas for how to fund it with progressive revenue. She also mentioned racial justice when it comes to housing - proposing support to help people of color buy homes or afford childcare as a form of reparations.

    Jenks is also passionate about protecting our climate. She wants to bring carbon-free electrification, higher standards for green buildings, and expanded public transit to our neighborhoods. Many of the changes in her climate plan will also make our neighborhoods more walkable, and give residents in Lake City and Bitter Lake an easier commute to the light rail.

    Although some of the other candidates have slightly more ambitious plans for housing and police reform, Jenks has a strong platform and has earned the most progressive endorsements in this race. We recommend Nilu Jenks for Seattle City Council from District 5.

    Nilu Jenks

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program.

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, Teamsters Joint Council 28, The Urbanist, UFCW 3000, King County Democrats
  • Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the District 6 seat on the Seattle City Council. Strauss was first elected in 2019, and he previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. Now, he is running for a second term to continue bringing community-focused leadership to District 6.

    On the council, Strauss has prioritized creating more affordable housing options and strengthening tenant rights. With investments of $250 million in 2022, permanent supportive housing was purchased in Green Lake, Ballard, and Greenwood. As the land use chair, he also points to how he has cleared encampments without sweeps by connecting people to services. Unfortunately, Strauss recently voted in favor of allowing Republican City Attorney Ann Davison to prosecute people for drug use. In addition, Strauss disappointed many advocates by pushing for larger police budgets, which would increase the presence of militarized police in our communities instead of making us safer. 

    If re-elected, Strauss will continue to develop Ballard Commons Park as a community green space, support the local small business economy, and ensure corporations and the wealthy pay what they owe. While he has not been the progressive leader some had hoped for, all of his viable opponents would be a step backward for the district and the city overall. Strauss has earned the majority of endorsements from progressive leaders and organizations and is the clear choice for city council from District 6.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Dan Strauss

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the District 6 seat on the Seattle City Council. Strauss was first elected in 2019, and he previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility.

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the District 6 seat on the Seattle City Council. Strauss was first elected in 2019, and he previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. Now, he is running for a second term to continue bringing community-focused leadership to District 6.

    On the council, Strauss has prioritized creating more affordable housing options and strengthening tenant rights. With investments of $250 million in 2022, permanent supportive housing was purchased in Green Lake, Ballard, and Greenwood. As the land use chair, he also points to how he has cleared encampments without sweeps by connecting people to services. Unfortunately, Strauss recently voted in favor of allowing Republican City Attorney Ann Davison to prosecute people for drug use. In addition, Strauss disappointed many advocates by pushing for larger police budgets, which would increase the presence of militarized police in our communities instead of making us safer. 

    If re-elected, Strauss will continue to develop Ballard Commons Park as a community green space, support the local small business economy, and ensure corporations and the wealthy pay what they owe. While he has not been the progressive leader some had hoped for, all of his viable opponents would be a step backward for the district and the city overall. Strauss has earned the majority of endorsements from progressive leaders and organizations and is the clear choice for city council from District 6.

    Dan Strauss

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the District 6 seat on the Seattle City Council. Strauss was first elected in 2019, and he previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility.

  • Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, where he worked on the Seattle Human Rights Commission. He also serves as the president of the Seattle Metropolitan Park District where he has worked to create jobs, ensure the cleanliness of public green space, and advance environmental goals for the city.

    In his first term on the council, Lewis prioritized funding affordable housing programs, ensuring community safety, and achieving greater climate protections to make Seattle a healthier place for all of us. He secured funding to fully renovate the Queen Anne Community Center and expanded the JustCARE program, which offers outreach, shelter, and wrap-around services to Seattleites without housing. In this race, he is running on a progressive platform to expand crisis support services, invest in social and transitional housing options, and improve the city’s public transit infrastructure to reduce both traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Lewis has earned an impressive list of endorsements from elected officials and key community leaders and is the most progressive choice in this race. Vote Andrew Lewis for Seattle City Council from District 7.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Andrew Lewis

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, where he worked on the Seattle Human Rights Commission.

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, where he worked on the Seattle Human Rights Commission. He also serves as the president of the Seattle Metropolitan Park District where he has worked to create jobs, ensure the cleanliness of public green space, and advance environmental goals for the city.

    In his first term on the council, Lewis prioritized funding affordable housing programs, ensuring community safety, and achieving greater climate protections to make Seattle a healthier place for all of us. He secured funding to fully renovate the Queen Anne Community Center and expanded the JustCARE program, which offers outreach, shelter, and wrap-around services to Seattleites without housing. In this race, he is running on a progressive platform to expand crisis support services, invest in social and transitional housing options, and improve the city’s public transit infrastructure to reduce both traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Lewis has earned an impressive list of endorsements from elected officials and key community leaders and is the most progressive choice in this race. Vote Andrew Lewis for Seattle City Council from District 7.

    Andrew Lewis

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, where he worked on the Seattle Human Rights Commission.