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Washington Conservation Action

Washington Conservation Action (WCA) is the political voice for the environment. WCV ensures Washington’s decision makers keep our environment protected, healthy, and vibrant. Over the last 35 years, we have elected environmental champions, held our elected leaders to the highest standard, and built statewide momentum for environmental campaigns through innovative voter outreach efforts and community organizing. Through our work, WCV is committed to making sure all people in Washington state have a healthy environment and a strong, sustainable economy.

County Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

  • Incumbent Dave Somers is running for re-election for Snohomish County Executive. A former member of the Snohomish County Council, Somers has served as executive since 2016, where he manages twelve county offices, including Human Services, Medical Examiner, and Emergency Management.

    In his previous term, Somers has supported measures to create parks and open spaces, invest in alternative fuels, aid salmon recovery, and develop the Snohomish County Housing Task Force to help meet the affordable housing needs of the community. More recently, Somers announced the Snohomish County Outreach Team (SCOUT) to pair social workers with law enforcement on behavioral health calls. Somers has also awarded $500,000 in federal recovery dollars for two new youth and family resource centers in the South County Korean Community Service Center and The Clearwater School. These two centers will help advance culturally-appropriate health services, community workshops, food access, and support for LGBTQ youth and families.

    Somers faces challenges from Republican Bob Hagglund and Democrat Christopher Garnett. Hagglund has served as the Snohomish County Republican Legislative District committee chairman since 2020 and he ran for secretary of state in 2022. In an interview with the Everett Herald, Hagglund said that he voted for Trump in 2020 and hopes more Republicans will run on new ideas. Despite that, he touts tired old ideas like “get treatment or go to jail” policies that have failed to address the root causes of homelessness and often end in cycling people through jail who may simply need affordable housing or small amounts of support.

    The other challenger, Democrat Christopher Garnett, has yet to raise any money or launch a campaign website with a platform as of early July. A brief line from an interview in a local paper quotes Garnett as promising 'rational' affordability and careful consideration of mental health resources.

    Somers is by far the best choice for Snohomish County Executive.

    Last updated: 2023-07-13

    Dave Somers

    Incumbent Dave Somers is running for re-election for Snohomish County Executive. A former member of the Snohomish County Council, Somers has served as executive since 2016, where he manages twelve county offices, including Human Services, Medical Examiner, and Emergency Management.

    Incumbent Dave Somers is running for re-election for Snohomish County Executive. A former member of the Snohomish County Council, Somers has served as executive since 2016, where he manages twelve county offices, including Human Services, Medical Examiner, and Emergency Management.

    In his previous term, Somers has supported measures to create parks and open spaces, invest in alternative fuels, aid salmon recovery, and develop the Snohomish County Housing Task Force to help meet the affordable housing needs of the community. More recently, Somers announced the Snohomish County Outreach Team (SCOUT) to pair social workers with law enforcement on behavioral health calls. Somers has also awarded $500,000 in federal recovery dollars for two new youth and family resource centers in the South County Korean Community Service Center and The Clearwater School. These two centers will help advance culturally-appropriate health services, community workshops, food access, and support for LGBTQ youth and families.

    Somers faces challenges from Republican Bob Hagglund and Democrat Christopher Garnett. Hagglund has served as the Snohomish County Republican Legislative District committee chairman since 2020 and he ran for secretary of state in 2022. In an interview with the Everett Herald, Hagglund said that he voted for Trump in 2020 and hopes more Republicans will run on new ideas. Despite that, he touts tired old ideas like “get treatment or go to jail” policies that have failed to address the root causes of homelessness and often end in cycling people through jail who may simply need affordable housing or small amounts of support.

    The other challenger, Democrat Christopher Garnett, has yet to raise any money or launch a campaign website with a platform as of early July. A brief line from an interview in a local paper quotes Garnett as promising 'rational' affordability and careful consideration of mental health resources.

    Somers is by far the best choice for Snohomish County Executive.

    Dave Somers

    Incumbent Dave Somers is running for re-election for Snohomish County Executive. A former member of the Snohomish County Council, Somers has served as executive since 2016, where he manages twelve county offices, including Human Services, Medical Examiner, and Emergency Management.

  • Cindy Gobel, a certification and training specialist with the Washington Secretary of State, is running for county auditor again after a narrow loss for the position four years ago. She previously served the public as a representative with the Women’s Law Caucus in Snohomish County from 2012 to 2015. Gobel states that she has spent 11 years working in records, licensing, and animal control with law enforcement, and several more years working in elections, including some in former Secretary of State Kim Wyman's office.

    Gobel views the auditor’s office as a place where we all come together – to register a pet, apply for a marriage license, or even register to vote. If elected, she has a progressive vision for strengthening our democratic systems, increasing transparency and community trust, and delivering efficient services for all residents. County auditors play an important role in upholding our election integrity, and Gobel wants to safeguard Snohomish voters from conspiracies and ensure every vote is counted. She also wants to implement accessibility measures to make sure that all Snohomish residents can make use of the services, especially non-English speakers and residents of color who have historically been left behind by the office.

    Gobel is challenging incumbent auditor Garth Fell, who has 24 years of county election management experience, including previously working as Snohomish County’s elections manager and as county auditor. If re-elected, Fell wants to continue to ensure accurate, transparent, and customer-focused elections and animal services. Fell’s leadership in the auditor’s office has been characterized as “steadfastly neutral” by the Everett Herald. However, with our democracy under attack from the right, it is imperative that our next county auditor has a bold, community-focused plan that seeks to improve the office rather than keep it as is.

    Also in this race is Robert Sutherland, the outgoing state representative for the 39th Legislative District. After losing his seat in the 2022 election to fellow Republican Sam Low, Sutherland is running for Snohomish County auditor. Unfortunately, Sutherland is also an election denier who stepped forward in 2021 to make false claims that the 2020 election was stolen from Trump by unproven fraud. The last thing Snohomish County needs is a conspiracy theorist running the critical job of ensuring election security and impartiality.

    Gobel has earned an impressive list of progressive and community endorsements in this race. She is the best choice for Snohomish County Auditor.

    Last updated: 2023-07-13

    Cindy Gobel

    Cindy Gobel, a certification and training specialist with the Washington Secretary of State, is running for county auditor again after a narrow loss for the position four years ago.

    Cindy Gobel, a certification and training specialist with the Washington Secretary of State, is running for county auditor again after a narrow loss for the position four years ago. She previously served the public as a representative with the Women’s Law Caucus in Snohomish County from 2012 to 2015. Gobel states that she has spent 11 years working in records, licensing, and animal control with law enforcement, and several more years working in elections, including some in former Secretary of State Kim Wyman's office.

    Gobel views the auditor’s office as a place where we all come together – to register a pet, apply for a marriage license, or even register to vote. If elected, she has a progressive vision for strengthening our democratic systems, increasing transparency and community trust, and delivering efficient services for all residents. County auditors play an important role in upholding our election integrity, and Gobel wants to safeguard Snohomish voters from conspiracies and ensure every vote is counted. She also wants to implement accessibility measures to make sure that all Snohomish residents can make use of the services, especially non-English speakers and residents of color who have historically been left behind by the office.

    Gobel is challenging incumbent auditor Garth Fell, who has 24 years of county election management experience, including previously working as Snohomish County’s elections manager and as county auditor. If re-elected, Fell wants to continue to ensure accurate, transparent, and customer-focused elections and animal services. Fell’s leadership in the auditor’s office has been characterized as “steadfastly neutral” by the Everett Herald. However, with our democracy under attack from the right, it is imperative that our next county auditor has a bold, community-focused plan that seeks to improve the office rather than keep it as is.

    Also in this race is Robert Sutherland, the outgoing state representative for the 39th Legislative District. After losing his seat in the 2022 election to fellow Republican Sam Low, Sutherland is running for Snohomish County auditor. Unfortunately, Sutherland is also an election denier who stepped forward in 2021 to make false claims that the 2020 election was stolen from Trump by unproven fraud. The last thing Snohomish County needs is a conspiracy theorist running the critical job of ensuring election security and impartiality.

    Gobel has earned an impressive list of progressive and community endorsements in this race. She is the best choice for Snohomish County Auditor.

    Cindy Gobel

    Cindy Gobel, a certification and training specialist with the Washington Secretary of State, is running for county auditor again after a narrow loss for the position four years ago.

  • Endorsed By: Washington Conservation Action, Snohomish County Democrats, Snohomish County Indivisible
  • Whatcom County Executive Satpal Sidhu is running for re-election this year. He is a small business owner, the former dean of Bellingham Technical College, and he served on the Whatcom County Council for four years prior to running for county executive in 2019. 

    Sidhu led Whatcom County through a particularly tumultuous period. Most of his first term was focused on supporting the community through the pandemic - which began just two months after he took office - and responding to the historic Nooksack River flood. During his first term, the Whatcom County Council also unanimously banned any expansion of fossil fuel facilities at Cherry Point after many years of debate and public protest. He was also supportive of the county's Climate Action Plan and reducing the use of natural gas in local buildings. Sidhu's track record on climate and conservation issues earned him the sole endorsement of Washington Climate Action in this race. 

    The other defining issue of Sidhu's term has been the ongoing fight about a new Whatcom County Jail. He has sometimes been at odds with progressive activists over how to handle this facility. In June, Sidhu proposed a 0.2 percent sales tax increase to build a new jail with 440 beds that would cost at least $137 million. Some local progressive organizations and elected officials expressed opposition to "building a new, bigger jail" and suggested using some of the funding for social services and housing. If he's re-elected, we hope Sidhu will adopt a more progressive stance on the jail facility and other issues involving the criminal legal system. 

    Sidhu also generated some criticism for his handling of The Healthy Children's Fund, which voters narrowly approved last November. Shortly after the election, he recommended reducing the tax rate written in the ballot measure because he expected it would raise more money than originally estimated. In March, he recommended redirecting $4.5 million from the levy to other purposes. The Whatcom County Council disagreed, voting 6-1 to maintain the funding for building and renovating child care facilities.

    Sidhu is running for a second term on a platform of housing affordability, salmon recovery, and flood resiliency. As he has throughout his term, Sidhu stresses the importance of finding common ground during a time of divisiveness in our local and national politics. He wants to work together with the county council to update zoning laws to allow more housing density in certain places while maintaining rural and agricultural land. He also touts his ongoing efforts to secure state and federal funding to build a "Skill Center" at Meridian High School to expand family-wage job opportunities in skilled trades. 

    Sidhu has earned many endorsements from local and state progressive leaders in this crowded race. If re-elected, he would be one of the few people of color in county leadership positions in Washington state. We lean toward Satpal Sidhu for Whatcom County Executive.

    Last updated: 2023-07-08

    Satpal Sidhu

    Whatcom County Executive Satpal Sidhu is running for re-election this year. He is a small business owner, the former dean of Bellingham Technical College, and he served on the Whatcom County Council for four years prior to running for county executive in 2019. 

    Whatcom County Executive Satpal Sidhu is running for re-election this year. He is a small business owner, the former dean of Bellingham Technical College, and he served on the Whatcom County Council for four years prior to running for county executive in 2019. 

    Sidhu led Whatcom County through a particularly tumultuous period. Most of his first term was focused on supporting the community through the pandemic - which began just two months after he took office - and responding to the historic Nooksack River flood. During his first term, the Whatcom County Council also unanimously banned any expansion of fossil fuel facilities at Cherry Point after many years of debate and public protest. He was also supportive of the county's Climate Action Plan and reducing the use of natural gas in local buildings. Sidhu's track record on climate and conservation issues earned him the sole endorsement of Washington Climate Action in this race. 

    The other defining issue of Sidhu's term has been the ongoing fight about a new Whatcom County Jail. He has sometimes been at odds with progressive activists over how to handle this facility. In June, Sidhu proposed a 0.2 percent sales tax increase to build a new jail with 440 beds that would cost at least $137 million. Some local progressive organizations and elected officials expressed opposition to "building a new, bigger jail" and suggested using some of the funding for social services and housing. If he's re-elected, we hope Sidhu will adopt a more progressive stance on the jail facility and other issues involving the criminal legal system. 

    Sidhu also generated some criticism for his handling of The Healthy Children's Fund, which voters narrowly approved last November. Shortly after the election, he recommended reducing the tax rate written in the ballot measure because he expected it would raise more money than originally estimated. In March, he recommended redirecting $4.5 million from the levy to other purposes. The Whatcom County Council disagreed, voting 6-1 to maintain the funding for building and renovating child care facilities.

    Sidhu is running for a second term on a platform of housing affordability, salmon recovery, and flood resiliency. As he has throughout his term, Sidhu stresses the importance of finding common ground during a time of divisiveness in our local and national politics. He wants to work together with the county council to update zoning laws to allow more housing density in certain places while maintaining rural and agricultural land. He also touts his ongoing efforts to secure state and federal funding to build a "Skill Center" at Meridian High School to expand family-wage job opportunities in skilled trades. 

    Sidhu has earned many endorsements from local and state progressive leaders in this crowded race. If re-elected, he would be one of the few people of color in county leadership positions in Washington state. We lean toward Satpal Sidhu for Whatcom County Executive.

    Satpal Sidhu

    Whatcom County Executive Satpal Sidhu is running for re-election this year. He is a small business owner, the former dean of Bellingham Technical College, and he served on the Whatcom County Council for four years prior to running for county executive in 2019. 

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county council races on your ballot.

  • Democratic Party activist and human rights advocate Jon Scanlon is running for At-Large, Position B on the Whatcom County Council. This seat is open following the retirement of Carol Frazey. Previously, Scanlon worked at the U.S. State Department and with OxFam America doing humanitarian work. In addition, he has been a consistent volunteer and elected leader within the Whatcom County Democrats. 

    Scanlon is running for office with a focus on affordability and environmental conservation. In particular, he would work to strengthen protections against flooding, ensure access to clean air and water, and preserve the county's farmlands and forests. His two decades of public policy and advocacy experience would also be a welcome addition to the council.

    Scanlon has earned an impressive slate of progressive endorsements and is the best choice for Whatcom County Council, At-Large Position B.

    Last updated: 2023-07-20

    Jon Scanlon

    Democratic Party activist and human rights advocate Jon Scanlon is running for At-Large, Position B on the Whatcom County Council. This seat is open following the retirement of Carol Frazey. Previously, Scanlon worked at the U.S. State Department and with OxFam America doing humanitarian work.

    Democratic Party activist and human rights advocate Jon Scanlon is running for At-Large, Position B on the Whatcom County Council. This seat is open following the retirement of Carol Frazey. Previously, Scanlon worked at the U.S. State Department and with OxFam America doing humanitarian work. In addition, he has been a consistent volunteer and elected leader within the Whatcom County Democrats. 

    Scanlon is running for office with a focus on affordability and environmental conservation. In particular, he would work to strengthen protections against flooding, ensure access to clean air and water, and preserve the county's farmlands and forests. His two decades of public policy and advocacy experience would also be a welcome addition to the council.

    Scanlon has earned an impressive slate of progressive endorsements and is the best choice for Whatcom County Council, At-Large Position B.

    Jon Scanlon

    Democratic Party activist and human rights advocate Jon Scanlon is running for At-Large, Position B on the Whatcom County Council. This seat is open following the retirement of Carol Frazey. Previously, Scanlon worked at the U.S. State Department and with OxFam America doing humanitarian work.

  • Endorsed By: Pro-Choice Washington, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 3000, Washington Conservation Action, The Riveters Collective, Bellingham/Whatcom Fire Fighters Union IAFF Local 106

County Council District Races

Depending on the county district you live in, you may have the following races on your ballot.

  • Jorge Barón is running to bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    Barón plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate organizations around the region on housing and other issues. He believes the county should address disparities in our communities, from providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change to ensuring that everyone can access public transit. 

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that generates outcomes we do not want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld and Poppe on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Given his particular experience, Barón is probably the most distinct candidate in this race. The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón is a great choice if you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader who will bring new perspectives to the King County Council with a record of coalition building and effective advocacy.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Jorge Barón is running to bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    Barón plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate organizations around the region on housing and other issues. He believes the county should address disparities in our communities, from providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change to ensuring that everyone can access public transit. 

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that generates outcomes we do not want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld and Poppe on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Given his particular experience, Barón is probably the most distinct candidate in this race. The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón is a great choice if you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader who will bring new perspectives to the King County Council with a record of coalition building and effective advocacy.

  • Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting the environment and public health. 

    Reyneveld has worked to help families and children across many volunteer roles, including as a board member of Washington’s Paramount Duty, an organization that advocates for more education funding, and as chair of the Women’s Advisory Board, which makes recommendations to the county for child care access and affordability. Reyneveld has also been a King County Democrats and 36th District Democrats executive board member, and vice chair of the Washington Conservation Action board of directors.

    In our interview with Reyneveld, she pointed to her experience in government and her long track record of advocacy as a sign of her readiness to hit the ground running on her three top priorities: equitable economic recovery, the environment, and housing. With an anticipated budget shortfall looming for the county, she emphasized the need for more progressive revenue for the county to help build 17,000 additional units of housing every year to keep up with population growth. She also mentioned the possibility of a dedicated countywide housing levy, which would create a funding source to build more diverse housing options, from multi-family homes to affordable housing.

    Reyneveld spoke to community safety as an upstream endeavor. She believes that incarceration is not the answer for people struggling with addiction and other health issues. Scaling up gun violence prevention programs and addiction treatment hubs are two policies she would advocate for on the council, and she would also consider policies like guaranteed basic income to help residents thrive. 

    Reyneveld's longtime experience in Democratic politics, community organizations, and legal advocacy distinguish her in this race.

    Last updated: 2023-07-12

    Sarah Reyneveld

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting the environment and public health. 

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting the environment and public health. 

    Reyneveld has worked to help families and children across many volunteer roles, including as a board member of Washington’s Paramount Duty, an organization that advocates for more education funding, and as chair of the Women’s Advisory Board, which makes recommendations to the county for child care access and affordability. Reyneveld has also been a King County Democrats and 36th District Democrats executive board member, and vice chair of the Washington Conservation Action board of directors.

    In our interview with Reyneveld, she pointed to her experience in government and her long track record of advocacy as a sign of her readiness to hit the ground running on her three top priorities: equitable economic recovery, the environment, and housing. With an anticipated budget shortfall looming for the county, she emphasized the need for more progressive revenue for the county to help build 17,000 additional units of housing every year to keep up with population growth. She also mentioned the possibility of a dedicated countywide housing levy, which would create a funding source to build more diverse housing options, from multi-family homes to affordable housing.

    Reyneveld spoke to community safety as an upstream endeavor. She believes that incarceration is not the answer for people struggling with addiction and other health issues. Scaling up gun violence prevention programs and addiction treatment hubs are two policies she would advocate for on the council, and she would also consider policies like guaranteed basic income to help residents thrive. 

    Reyneveld's longtime experience in Democratic politics, community organizations, and legal advocacy distinguish her in this race.

    Sarah Reyneveld

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting the environment and public health. 

  • Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

  • Megan Dunn, the program director for the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, is running for re-election to Snohomish County Council from District 2. Prior to being elected to the council in 2019, Dunn led the successful effort to create districts for the Everett City Council and served on the Everett Community Streets Initiative Task Force, which helps address homelessness in downtown Everett.

    Dunn ran in 2019 for Snohomish County Council to continue her work on community-building and environmental sustainability. She's met her campaign promises by using pandemic recovery funding for district organizations that are committed to helping neighbors - the Interfaith Family Shelter, Everett Recovery Café, and Madres de Casino Road's meal program.

    She's focused on voting for policies that would best uplift people experiencing homelessness and poverty. Dunn was one of three council members who voted to convert two hotels into low-barrier shelters for people experiencing homelessness. She correctly noted that putting up barriers like drug testing would have put 20 million federal dollars at risk of being lost and likely would have prevented the shelter from being built. 

    Dunn faces a challenge from Georgia Fisher, a precinct committee officer for the Snohomish County Republican Party and district chair for the 21st Legislative District Republicans. In addressing the opioid and drug epidemic, she wants to see more and more people arrested for addiction, sending more people in crisis to jail. Much of her campaign platform follows a familiar path for conservatives this year, with promises to support business and pour even more funds into police, rather than address the root causes of the community's issues. For reference, the county already spends over 75 percent of its $288.5 million general budget on police and the criminal legal system. 

    If elected, Dunn will continue to advocate for those that need it most in the county. She is by far the best choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Megan Dunn

    Megan Dunn, the program director for the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, is running for re-election to Snohomish County Council from District 2.

    Megan Dunn, the program director for the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, is running for re-election to Snohomish County Council from District 2. Prior to being elected to the council in 2019, Dunn led the successful effort to create districts for the Everett City Council and served on the Everett Community Streets Initiative Task Force, which helps address homelessness in downtown Everett.

    Dunn ran in 2019 for Snohomish County Council to continue her work on community-building and environmental sustainability. She's met her campaign promises by using pandemic recovery funding for district organizations that are committed to helping neighbors - the Interfaith Family Shelter, Everett Recovery Café, and Madres de Casino Road's meal program.

    She's focused on voting for policies that would best uplift people experiencing homelessness and poverty. Dunn was one of three council members who voted to convert two hotels into low-barrier shelters for people experiencing homelessness. She correctly noted that putting up barriers like drug testing would have put 20 million federal dollars at risk of being lost and likely would have prevented the shelter from being built. 

    Dunn faces a challenge from Georgia Fisher, a precinct committee officer for the Snohomish County Republican Party and district chair for the 21st Legislative District Republicans. In addressing the opioid and drug epidemic, she wants to see more and more people arrested for addiction, sending more people in crisis to jail. Much of her campaign platform follows a familiar path for conservatives this year, with promises to support business and pour even more funds into police, rather than address the root causes of the community's issues. For reference, the county already spends over 75 percent of its $288.5 million general budget on police and the criminal legal system. 

    If elected, Dunn will continue to advocate for those that need it most in the county. She is by far the best choice in this race.

    Megan Dunn

    Megan Dunn, the program director for the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, is running for re-election to Snohomish County Council from District 2.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU 775, UFCW 3000, Washington Conservation Action, Housing Action Fund, Washington Education Association PAC, Alliance for Gun Responsibility

Port Races

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below races on your ballot.

  • Maggie Sanders is running for the newly created District 4 seat on the Port of Olympia. Sanders identifies as a “triple citizen” of the United States, of the Washington community at-large, and of the Makah tribe. She has dedicated her career to public service, working in environmental stewardship, workforce development, and community advocacy, particularly for tribal representation and within the Makah tribe. In her most recent position, Sanders advocated for clean air, representing local tribes as a commissioner on the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Tribal Air Association.

    If elected, Sanders wants to be a staunch advocate for environmental and community concerns on the port. She believes that there can’t be economic development without both community and workforce development to ensure that port investments can lift all boats. Her extensive experience in public service and expertise in public administration paired with her demonstrated progressive values position her well to execute her campaign priorities. In this race, Sanders has far outpaced her opponents in progressive endorsements.

    Sanders faces three opponents in this race for the new commissioner seat. Rose Chiu Gundersen is a first-time candidate and business leader. Gundersen grew up in Hong Kong and has established herself strongly in the community as a small business owner, liaison for small businesses to the Washington State Department of Labor, and most recently in high-level retail services for the Washington Retail Association. She co-founded Washington Trafficking Prevention. In this campaign, her top priority is to beautify the waterfront to make Thurston County a destination, and she also wants to combat human trafficking, create living wage jobs, and invest in some environmental clean-ups.

    Also in this race is Joanna Manson, a professional city planner. Manson has held community leadership positions with the International Division of the American Planning Association and her church, and she volunteers with The Nature Conservancy and with the county’s Earth Day programming. While she displays a strong grasp of port procedures and issues, she lacks a bold progressive vision. If elected, she wants to ensure effective and responsible port governance that reflects the needs of all residents, including rural voices.

    Bill Moomau is the final candidate in this race. Moomau spent three decades at the Department of Labor and Industries. He volunteers for a number of AIDS-related advocacy groups and previously served as the director of the Thurston County Fairboard. Moomau’s campaign platform is heavily focused on economic planning for the port and lacks some of the community and environmental considerations of his opponents. However, he does have some ideas for using port resources to mitigate the housing crisis.

    We recommend Maggie Sanders for Port of Olympia, District 4 to bring her progressive vision and public service experience to the commission.

    Last updated: 2023-07-13

    Maggie Sanders

    Submitted by Collin on Thu, 07/13/2023 - 09:53

    Maggie Sanders is running for the newly created District 4 seat on the Port of Olympia. Sanders identifies as a “triple citizen” of the United States, of the Washington community at-large, and of the Makah tribe.

    Maggie Sanders is running for the newly created District 4 seat on the Port of Olympia. Sanders identifies as a “triple citizen” of the United States, of the Washington community at-large, and of the Makah tribe. She has dedicated her career to public service, working in environmental stewardship, workforce development, and community advocacy, particularly for tribal representation and within the Makah tribe. In her most recent position, Sanders advocated for clean air, representing local tribes as a commissioner on the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Tribal Air Association.

    If elected, Sanders wants to be a staunch advocate for environmental and community concerns on the port. She believes that there can’t be economic development without both community and workforce development to ensure that port investments can lift all boats. Her extensive experience in public service and expertise in public administration paired with her demonstrated progressive values position her well to execute her campaign priorities. In this race, Sanders has far outpaced her opponents in progressive endorsements.

    Sanders faces three opponents in this race for the new commissioner seat. Rose Chiu Gundersen is a first-time candidate and business leader. Gundersen grew up in Hong Kong and has established herself strongly in the community as a small business owner, liaison for small businesses to the Washington State Department of Labor, and most recently in high-level retail services for the Washington Retail Association. She co-founded Washington Trafficking Prevention. In this campaign, her top priority is to beautify the waterfront to make Thurston County a destination, and she also wants to combat human trafficking, create living wage jobs, and invest in some environmental clean-ups.

    Also in this race is Joanna Manson, a professional city planner. Manson has held community leadership positions with the International Division of the American Planning Association and her church, and she volunteers with The Nature Conservancy and with the county’s Earth Day programming. While she displays a strong grasp of port procedures and issues, she lacks a bold progressive vision. If elected, she wants to ensure effective and responsible port governance that reflects the needs of all residents, including rural voices.

    Bill Moomau is the final candidate in this race. Moomau spent three decades at the Department of Labor and Industries. He volunteers for a number of AIDS-related advocacy groups and previously served as the director of the Thurston County Fairboard. Moomau’s campaign platform is heavily focused on economic planning for the port and lacks some of the community and environmental considerations of his opponents. However, he does have some ideas for using port resources to mitigate the housing crisis.

    We recommend Maggie Sanders for Port of Olympia, District 4 to bring her progressive vision and public service experience to the commission.

    Maggie Sanders

    Submitted by Collin on Thu, 07/13/2023 - 09:53

    Maggie Sanders is running for the newly created District 4 seat on the Port of Olympia. Sanders identifies as a “triple citizen” of the United States, of the Washington community at-large, and of the Makah tribe.

  • Endorsed By: Teamsters Joint Council 28, Washington Conservation Action, Thurston County Democrats
  • Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016. With his science background, Felleman has pledged to continue supporting environmentally friendly reforms at the port.

    In his time as commissioner, Felleman has focused on fighting climate change and increasing the port's green energy jobs. He has been a leader on the commission when it comes to protecting orcas, publicly opposing the dangerous Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and advocating for well-paying jobs. Elected commission president in 2021, he has recently supported more efficient and greener policies at the port to reduce pollution, including adding solar panels to Fishermen's Terminal's net shed and powering new docks so that ships don't have to idle and burn additional fuel.

    Felleman often supports social causes as well, including condemning Trump's Muslim ban and government agencies’ response at the airport, as well as welcoming Ukranian refugees, with Washington hosting 16,000 refugees, the third most of any state in the U.S.

    Felleman has earned your vote for Port of Seatle, Position #5.

    Last updated: 2023-07-13

    Fred Felleman

    Submitted by stephanie on Wed, 07/05/2023 - 13:54

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016.

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016. With his science background, Felleman has pledged to continue supporting environmentally friendly reforms at the port.

    In his time as commissioner, Felleman has focused on fighting climate change and increasing the port's green energy jobs. He has been a leader on the commission when it comes to protecting orcas, publicly opposing the dangerous Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and advocating for well-paying jobs. Elected commission president in 2021, he has recently supported more efficient and greener policies at the port to reduce pollution, including adding solar panels to Fishermen's Terminal's net shed and powering new docks so that ships don't have to idle and burn additional fuel.

    Felleman often supports social causes as well, including condemning Trump's Muslim ban and government agencies’ response at the airport, as well as welcoming Ukranian refugees, with Washington hosting 16,000 refugees, the third most of any state in the U.S.

    Felleman has earned your vote for Port of Seatle, Position #5.

    Fred Felleman

    Submitted by stephanie on Wed, 07/05/2023 - 13:54

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following city races on your ballot.

  • Carston Curd is a natural resources planner and licensed geologist running to bring a progressive and sustainable vision to Bothell City Council, Position 4. He currently serves on the Sound Transit Community Oversight Panel, as vice chair of the Bothell Planning Commission, and as third vice chair for the 1st Legislative District Democrats. Curd is also a volunteer for a number of grassroots and community initiatives within the Northshore area.

    Curd is an advocate for green spaces and educates the community on complex topics that impact the solutions to the lack of affordable homes. As a progressive environmental advocate, his platform priorities include increasing the number of affordable homes, making transit accessible, and building resilience to urban flooding. As a current public servant in Snohomish County, Curd brings valuable experience and has garnered the support of many local Democrats including Bothell Mayor Mason Thompson.

    Also running is Ann Aagaard, who brings a long list of accolades as an environmental advocate at the state and federal levels. In the late 1970s, she founded the grassroots environmental organization Save Our Valuable Environment, which worked on zoning and wetland protection measures. Her most notable achievement is the three-decade North Creek Valley wetland restoration project that now serves as a core teaching function at the University of Washington Bothell and Cascadia Community College. While we appreciate Aagaard's long record on environmental protection, her platform and policies are thin on the other pressing issues facing Bothell like housing, transit, policing, and homelessness services.

    Mark Swanson has stated in local interviews that he's "not actively campaigning," though he made it through the primary election. Though he has no website available with a comprehensive look at his policy proposals, he states that there is no affordable housing crisis in Bothell, despite much evidence to the contrary. Much of his platform seems to be anti-growth, and in a League of Women Voters forum he states that he will curb growth in the city, preventing the building of affordable and family apartments to keep only single family neighborhoods in the area.

    Carston Curd will work to fight climate change, improve housing affordability, and expand transit access in Bothell. He is the best choice for Bothell City Council, Position 4.

    Last updated: 2023-09-08

    Carston Curd

    Carston Curd is a natural resources planner and licensed geologist running to bring a progressive and sustainable vision to Bothell City Council, Position 4.

    Carston Curd is a natural resources planner and licensed geologist running to bring a progressive and sustainable vision to Bothell City Council, Position 4. He currently serves on the Sound Transit Community Oversight Panel, as vice chair of the Bothell Planning Commission, and as third vice chair for the 1st Legislative District Democrats. Curd is also a volunteer for a number of grassroots and community initiatives within the Northshore area.

    Curd is an advocate for green spaces and educates the community on complex topics that impact the solutions to the lack of affordable homes. As a progressive environmental advocate, his platform priorities include increasing the number of affordable homes, making transit accessible, and building resilience to urban flooding. As a current public servant in Snohomish County, Curd brings valuable experience and has garnered the support of many local Democrats including Bothell Mayor Mason Thompson.

    Also running is Ann Aagaard, who brings a long list of accolades as an environmental advocate at the state and federal levels. In the late 1970s, she founded the grassroots environmental organization Save Our Valuable Environment, which worked on zoning and wetland protection measures. Her most notable achievement is the three-decade North Creek Valley wetland restoration project that now serves as a core teaching function at the University of Washington Bothell and Cascadia Community College. While we appreciate Aagaard's long record on environmental protection, her platform and policies are thin on the other pressing issues facing Bothell like housing, transit, policing, and homelessness services.

    Mark Swanson has stated in local interviews that he's "not actively campaigning," though he made it through the primary election. Though he has no website available with a comprehensive look at his policy proposals, he states that there is no affordable housing crisis in Bothell, despite much evidence to the contrary. Much of his platform seems to be anti-growth, and in a League of Women Voters forum he states that he will curb growth in the city, preventing the building of affordable and family apartments to keep only single family neighborhoods in the area.

    Carston Curd will work to fight climate change, improve housing affordability, and expand transit access in Bothell. He is the best choice for Bothell City Council, Position 4.

    Carston Curd

    Carston Curd is a natural resources planner and licensed geologist running to bring a progressive and sustainable vision to Bothell City Council, Position 4.

  • Victoria Hunt is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 6. She is a data scientist at Breakthrough Energy, where she leads research efforts on renewable energy and does climate analyses to help cities meet their climate plans. She was elected to the council in 2019 and holds a Ph.D. in ecology.

    In office, Hunt has been a champion for environmental protection. During her two years as council president, she helped pass the city's climate action plan. She also advocated for the acquisition and preservation of the 46-acre Bergsma property, which was one of the few remaining unprotected areas in the Issaquah Alps. This conservation effort will enable the development of a trail connecting the Talus development and Tibbetts Valley Park, and facilitate the expansion of Harvey Manning Park.

    Hunt has been involved in advocating for ambitious climate action at the state level as well, supporting House Bill 1589 to make the largest energy supplier in Washington transition to clean energy.

    Hunt also has a good track record when it comes to affordable housing. She was the only council member to support all the recommendations from the Regional Coalition on Housing (ARCH) that would combat landlords' continued raising of rents in Issaquah. Hunt has also said she would like to study and expand housing options so that people with lower or moderate incomes can find and keep their homes.

    Hunt clearly stands out in this race with her knowledge and experience on issues like environmental stewardship and sustainable development in Issaquah. Vote for Victoria Hunt for Issaquah City Council, Position 6.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Victoria Hunt

    Victoria Hunt is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 6. She is a data scientist at Breakthrough Energy, where she leads research efforts on renewable energy and does climate analyses to help cities meet their climate plans.

    Victoria Hunt is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 6. She is a data scientist at Breakthrough Energy, where she leads research efforts on renewable energy and does climate analyses to help cities meet their climate plans. She was elected to the council in 2019 and holds a Ph.D. in ecology.

    In office, Hunt has been a champion for environmental protection. During her two years as council president, she helped pass the city's climate action plan. She also advocated for the acquisition and preservation of the 46-acre Bergsma property, which was one of the few remaining unprotected areas in the Issaquah Alps. This conservation effort will enable the development of a trail connecting the Talus development and Tibbetts Valley Park, and facilitate the expansion of Harvey Manning Park.

    Hunt has been involved in advocating for ambitious climate action at the state level as well, supporting House Bill 1589 to make the largest energy supplier in Washington transition to clean energy.

    Hunt also has a good track record when it comes to affordable housing. She was the only council member to support all the recommendations from the Regional Coalition on Housing (ARCH) that would combat landlords' continued raising of rents in Issaquah. Hunt has also said she would like to study and expand housing options so that people with lower or moderate incomes can find and keep their homes.

    Hunt clearly stands out in this race with her knowledge and experience on issues like environmental stewardship and sustainable development in Issaquah. Vote for Victoria Hunt for Issaquah City Council, Position 6.

    Victoria Hunt

    Victoria Hunt is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 6. She is a data scientist at Breakthrough Energy, where she leads research efforts on renewable energy and does climate analyses to help cities meet their climate plans.

  • Endorsed By: Washington Conservation Action, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Osman Salahuddin is running for Position 1 on the Redmond City Council after Councilmember Varisha Khan declined to run for re-election. Salahuddin works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for King County Councilmember Sarah Perry. He is currently on the board of directors for the Muslim Association of Puget Sound and previously served as student body president at the University of Washington. 

    Salahuddin is running to reduce the cost of housing in Redmond and ensure everyone feels safe in their community. If elected, he would improve neighborhood walkability and invest more in affordable housing solutions like the Together Center. In addition, he would work to modernize Redmond's building codes to encourage green construction and promote energy efficiency. 

    Salahuddin is facing two conservative opponents in this race: Paul Stepanov and Nate Niederhausern. Stepanov has founded several technology startups including Virtudesk, which helps businesses outsource customer service and administrative jobs. In 2020, Stepanov supported MAGA Republican Loren Culp for governor. Culp compared gun safety laws to the Holocaust and joined President Trump in seeking to overthrow the will of the people after the 2020 election. 

    Niederhausern works in digital streaming and online learning for corporations. He is active with the Redmond LDS Boy Scout troops, particularly on environmental conservation. Niederhausern appears to be newer to politics. While he will be on the primary ballot himself this year, he has not voted in a primary election in 15 years. In addition, he supported Republican Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign against President Obama. 

    Salahuddin is the clear choice for Redmond City Council, Position 1.

    Last updated: 2023-07-12

    Osman Salahuddin

    Osman Salahuddin is running for Position 1 on the Redmond City Council after Councilmember Varisha Khan declined to run for re-election. Salahuddin works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for King County Councilmember Sarah Perry.

    Osman Salahuddin is running for Position 1 on the Redmond City Council after Councilmember Varisha Khan declined to run for re-election. Salahuddin works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for King County Councilmember Sarah Perry. He is currently on the board of directors for the Muslim Association of Puget Sound and previously served as student body president at the University of Washington. 

    Salahuddin is running to reduce the cost of housing in Redmond and ensure everyone feels safe in their community. If elected, he would improve neighborhood walkability and invest more in affordable housing solutions like the Together Center. In addition, he would work to modernize Redmond's building codes to encourage green construction and promote energy efficiency. 

    Salahuddin is facing two conservative opponents in this race: Paul Stepanov and Nate Niederhausern. Stepanov has founded several technology startups including Virtudesk, which helps businesses outsource customer service and administrative jobs. In 2020, Stepanov supported MAGA Republican Loren Culp for governor. Culp compared gun safety laws to the Holocaust and joined President Trump in seeking to overthrow the will of the people after the 2020 election. 

    Niederhausern works in digital streaming and online learning for corporations. He is active with the Redmond LDS Boy Scout troops, particularly on environmental conservation. Niederhausern appears to be newer to politics. While he will be on the primary ballot himself this year, he has not voted in a primary election in 15 years. In addition, he supported Republican Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign against President Obama. 

    Salahuddin is the clear choice for Redmond City Council, Position 1.

    Osman Salahuddin

    Osman Salahuddin is running for Position 1 on the Redmond City Council after Councilmember Varisha Khan declined to run for re-election. Salahuddin works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for King County Councilmember Sarah Perry.

  • Lisa Brown is a former state representative, senate majority leader, and chancellor of Washington State University Spokane. She has also served as the Washington State Director of Commerce. Brown has spent many years advocating for and volunteering in Spokane, including organizing the first Take Back the Night rally to bring awareness to victims of domestic violence.

    Brown wants to use her experience to see the city invest in a quality life for all residents. That means fair and transparent processes on everything from neighborhood safety to small businesses. A keystone of her campaign is increasing affordable housing to help the many residents who are struggling to find shelter or stay in their homes with housing cost increases.

    One of many major differences between Brown and incumbent mayor Nadine Woodward is Brown's focus on upstream investments to prevent crime. Brown wants to see more investment in proven prevention strategies that keep us safe, like apprenticeships, mental health services, and affordable housing.

    Spokane has had conservative mayors for the last twelve years, and Brown offers the chance to transform the city and local government in Spokane. Vote for Lisa Brown for a more compassionate and affordable Spokane.

    Last updated: 2023-07-08

    Lisa Brown

    Lisa Brown is a former state representative, senate majority leader, and chancellor of Washington State University Spokane. She has also served as the Washington State Director of Commerce.

    Lisa Brown is a former state representative, senate majority leader, and chancellor of Washington State University Spokane. She has also served as the Washington State Director of Commerce. Brown has spent many years advocating for and volunteering in Spokane, including organizing the first Take Back the Night rally to bring awareness to victims of domestic violence.

    Brown wants to use her experience to see the city invest in a quality life for all residents. That means fair and transparent processes on everything from neighborhood safety to small businesses. A keystone of her campaign is increasing affordable housing to help the many residents who are struggling to find shelter or stay in their homes with housing cost increases.

    One of many major differences between Brown and incumbent mayor Nadine Woodward is Brown's focus on upstream investments to prevent crime. Brown wants to see more investment in proven prevention strategies that keep us safe, like apprenticeships, mental health services, and affordable housing.

    Spokane has had conservative mayors for the last twelve years, and Brown offers the chance to transform the city and local government in Spokane. Vote for Lisa Brown for a more compassionate and affordable Spokane.

    Lisa Brown

    Lisa Brown is a former state representative, senate majority leader, and chancellor of Washington State University Spokane. She has also served as the Washington State Director of Commerce.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU 775, UFCW 3000, Washington Conservation Action, Housing Action Fund, Washington Education Association PAC
  • Paul Dillon is running for Spokane City Council, District 2 as an experienced and fearless advocate for opportunity for all in the city. 

    There's no doubt about the breadth and depth of Dillon's experience working and volunteering for the residents of Spokane. He currently works as the vice president of public affairs for Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho. Dillon is also the former Eastern Washington director for the YMCA Youth and Government Program and has served as a board member for the Center For Justice, Washington Bikes, and Pedals2People.

    If elected, Dillon wants to raise the minimum wage to boost the local economy and support struggling families. As someone who once ran an environmental advocacy news site published by The Spokesman-Review, Dillon wants to revisit local laws on oil train derailments to protect the environment. Also high on his priorities is to build new affordable housing units to alleviate rising housing costs for everyone in the community and fund transitional shelters and behavioral health rather than criminalizing homelessness. 

    Dillon's community safety stance is more detailed and more progressive than his opponents. He notes that due to racist incarceration policies, we have a system where African Americans, who are two percent of the population in Spokane, make up 14 percent of the jail population. He would invest in alternatives to incarceration, and use public health and behavioral health interventions instead of police where applicable, like sending unarmed officers or mental health responders.

    By fully funding the Office of Civil Rights and Equity, working to uplift working families, and promoting community safety, Dillon demonstrates his desire to lead from progressive values. His broad endorsements from labor, environmental organizations, and Democratic elected officials speak to the power of his campaign to make the city a better place to live for all. Vote Paul Dillon for Spokane City Council from District 2.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Paul Dillon

    Paul Dillon is running for Spokane City Council, District 2 as an experienced and fearless advocate for opportunity for all in the city. 

    Paul Dillon is running for Spokane City Council, District 2 as an experienced and fearless advocate for opportunity for all in the city. 

    There's no doubt about the breadth and depth of Dillon's experience working and volunteering for the residents of Spokane. He currently works as the vice president of public affairs for Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho. Dillon is also the former Eastern Washington director for the YMCA Youth and Government Program and has served as a board member for the Center For Justice, Washington Bikes, and Pedals2People.

    If elected, Dillon wants to raise the minimum wage to boost the local economy and support struggling families. As someone who once ran an environmental advocacy news site published by The Spokesman-Review, Dillon wants to revisit local laws on oil train derailments to protect the environment. Also high on his priorities is to build new affordable housing units to alleviate rising housing costs for everyone in the community and fund transitional shelters and behavioral health rather than criminalizing homelessness. 

    Dillon's community safety stance is more detailed and more progressive than his opponents. He notes that due to racist incarceration policies, we have a system where African Americans, who are two percent of the population in Spokane, make up 14 percent of the jail population. He would invest in alternatives to incarceration, and use public health and behavioral health interventions instead of police where applicable, like sending unarmed officers or mental health responders.

    By fully funding the Office of Civil Rights and Equity, working to uplift working families, and promoting community safety, Dillon demonstrates his desire to lead from progressive values. His broad endorsements from labor, environmental organizations, and Democratic elected officials speak to the power of his campaign to make the city a better place to live for all. Vote Paul Dillon for Spokane City Council from District 2.

    Paul Dillon

    Paul Dillon is running for Spokane City Council, District 2 as an experienced and fearless advocate for opportunity for all in the city. 

  • Endorsed By: SEIU 775, UFCW 3000, Washington Conservation Action, Washington Education Association PAC, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Esteban Herevia is running for Spokane City Council to bring a vision of joy and safety for all residents to city hall. He is currently the strategist for health justice and belonging at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. Until recently, he was also president and CEO of Spokane Pride, the organization which holds the annual Spokane Pride festival.

    Herevia explained his vision for a Spokane where everyone is thriving and welcome in his local Fuse questionnaire. Herevia became homeless in his youth after his family inflicted violence on him when he came out to them. This has informed his views on homelessness as a candidate. He knows that many living on the streets today are community members who have suffered bad luck or economic misfortune. If elected, he plans to embrace more affordable housing to ensure the dignity of all who live in Spokane. Specifically, he would prioritize ensuring any new developments have 30 percent affordable housing and supports multiple types of zoning to maximize the types of housing available.

    On the issue of public safety, Herevia would empower the police ombudsman to independently investigate police misconduct, including the police chief's alleged preferential treatment of wealthy business owners. He also believes that in the upcoming contract negotiation, the city must emphasize unarmed officers for nonviolent calls and having mental health professionals attend relevant 911 calls alongside police.

    Herevia recently faced an accusation of improper conduct with a student while he was an employee at Whitworth University. The Spokesman-Review published a detailed story that presents both sides of the issue, including transcripts of their text message conversations, which you can read here.

    Herevia would be a strong advocate for marginalized communities and equality for all in Spokane.

    Last updated: 2023-07-11

    Esteban Herevia

    Esteban Herevia is running for Spokane City Council to bring a vision of joy and safety for all residents to city hall. He is currently the strategist for health justice and belonging at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

    Esteban Herevia is running for Spokane City Council to bring a vision of joy and safety for all residents to city hall. He is currently the strategist for health justice and belonging at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. Until recently, he was also president and CEO of Spokane Pride, the organization which holds the annual Spokane Pride festival.

    Herevia explained his vision for a Spokane where everyone is thriving and welcome in his local Fuse questionnaire. Herevia became homeless in his youth after his family inflicted violence on him when he came out to them. This has informed his views on homelessness as a candidate. He knows that many living on the streets today are community members who have suffered bad luck or economic misfortune. If elected, he plans to embrace more affordable housing to ensure the dignity of all who live in Spokane. Specifically, he would prioritize ensuring any new developments have 30 percent affordable housing and supports multiple types of zoning to maximize the types of housing available.

    On the issue of public safety, Herevia would empower the police ombudsman to independently investigate police misconduct, including the police chief's alleged preferential treatment of wealthy business owners. He also believes that in the upcoming contract negotiation, the city must emphasize unarmed officers for nonviolent calls and having mental health professionals attend relevant 911 calls alongside police.

    Herevia recently faced an accusation of improper conduct with a student while he was an employee at Whitworth University. The Spokesman-Review published a detailed story that presents both sides of the issue, including transcripts of their text message conversations, which you can read here.

    Herevia would be a strong advocate for marginalized communities and equality for all in Spokane.

    Esteban Herevia

    Esteban Herevia is running for Spokane City Council to bring a vision of joy and safety for all residents to city hall. He is currently the strategist for health justice and belonging at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, UFCW 3000, Washington Conservation Action, Spokane Regional Labor Council, Washington Education Association PAC
  • Former army reserve medic Kitty Klitze is running to bring her transportation expertise to the Spokane City Council. As the former chair of Spokane's Community Assembly Pedestrian, Transportation, and Traffic Committee, chair of the Spokane Regional Transportation Advisory Committee, and president of the Spokane Regional Food Policy Council, Klitze has been deeply involved in the community. She also led Complete Streets Spokane, which successfully advocated for bike and pedestrian infrastructure requirements when planning and building streets.

    In our local interview, Klitzke had solid and progressive answers to many of the issues facing Spokane. Like Herevia, she agreed that the police ombudsman should be granted the power to independently investigate community complaints, which voters overwhelmingly approved. She also believed that Spokane needs to stop incentivizing housing that is not affordable and start incentivizing the development of vacant lots, buildings, and parking lots. On homelessness, she supports a housing-first approach that helps people find shelter and secure homes as well as needed services.

    Klitzke is a good choice for those looking for an accomplished transportation advocate who is excited to take on the city's needs for long-term planning and vision.

    Last updated: 2023-07-11

    Kitty Klitzke

    Former army reserve medic Kitty Klitze is running to bring her transportation expertise to the Spokane City Council.

    Former army reserve medic Kitty Klitze is running to bring her transportation expertise to the Spokane City Council. As the former chair of Spokane's Community Assembly Pedestrian, Transportation, and Traffic Committee, chair of the Spokane Regional Transportation Advisory Committee, and president of the Spokane Regional Food Policy Council, Klitze has been deeply involved in the community. She also led Complete Streets Spokane, which successfully advocated for bike and pedestrian infrastructure requirements when planning and building streets.

    In our local interview, Klitzke had solid and progressive answers to many of the issues facing Spokane. Like Herevia, she agreed that the police ombudsman should be granted the power to independently investigate community complaints, which voters overwhelmingly approved. She also believed that Spokane needs to stop incentivizing housing that is not affordable and start incentivizing the development of vacant lots, buildings, and parking lots. On homelessness, she supports a housing-first approach that helps people find shelter and secure homes as well as needed services.

    Klitzke is a good choice for those looking for an accomplished transportation advocate who is excited to take on the city's needs for long-term planning and vision.

    Kitty Klitzke

    Former army reserve medic Kitty Klitze is running to bring her transportation expertise to the Spokane City Council.

  • Endorsed By: Pro-Choice Washington, SEIU 775, SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, Washington Conservation Action, Spokane Regional Labor Council, Firefighters Local 29, Washington Education Association PAC
  • Deputy Mayor Kristina Walker is running for re-election for At-Large Position 8 on the Tacoma City Council. Prior to serving on the city council, Walker spent nine years as the executive director of Downtown on the Go, a Tacoma-based transportation advocacy organization that aims to encourage the use of biking, walking, and transit. 

    During her first term in office, Walker has prioritized addressing racial disparities, expanding shelter options, and investing more in affordable housing. She supported the Home in Tacoma initiative to promote a greater range of housing options in more neighborhoods and reduce the cost of housing. She has also used her experience in transportation advocacy to improve access and keep our streets safe, including supporting legislation to lower the speed limit to 20 mph in residential areas. Unfortunately, Walker was part of a 6-3 majority on the city council that banned people without a home from sleeping outside near services. 

    If re-elected, Walker would prioritize creating jobs, improving transportation access, and preserving local green spaces for all Tacoma residents. In addition, she is committed to reducing gun violence and improving public safety

    Walker faces challenges this year from Todd Briske and Hunter Henderson. Briske is a web developer who ran for state legislature last year against Speaker Laurie Jinkins as part of the Forward Party. He does not appear to have much community or political leadership experience. He states that he would focus on paving potholes, hiring more police officers, and building more shelter beds, though he doesn't say how he would accomplish this. 

    Henderson works at the Washington State Department of Transportation. Previously, he served as an AmeriCorps member with Pierce County Parks and Recreation distributing trees across the region. Henderson's campaign priorities include updating Tacoma's municipal codes to be more equitable and expanding education opportunities for people who want to learn trades. 

    Walker's track record on the council and strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partners makes her the clear choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2023-07-17

    Kristina Walker

    Deputy Mayor Kristina Walker is running for re-election for At-Large Position 8 on the Tacoma City Council.

    Deputy Mayor Kristina Walker is running for re-election for At-Large Position 8 on the Tacoma City Council. Prior to serving on the city council, Walker spent nine years as the executive director of Downtown on the Go, a Tacoma-based transportation advocacy organization that aims to encourage the use of biking, walking, and transit. 

    During her first term in office, Walker has prioritized addressing racial disparities, expanding shelter options, and investing more in affordable housing. She supported the Home in Tacoma initiative to promote a greater range of housing options in more neighborhoods and reduce the cost of housing. She has also used her experience in transportation advocacy to improve access and keep our streets safe, including supporting legislation to lower the speed limit to 20 mph in residential areas. Unfortunately, Walker was part of a 6-3 majority on the city council that banned people without a home from sleeping outside near services. 

    If re-elected, Walker would prioritize creating jobs, improving transportation access, and preserving local green spaces for all Tacoma residents. In addition, she is committed to reducing gun violence and improving public safety

    Walker faces challenges this year from Todd Briske and Hunter Henderson. Briske is a web developer who ran for state legislature last year against Speaker Laurie Jinkins as part of the Forward Party. He does not appear to have much community or political leadership experience. He states that he would focus on paving potholes, hiring more police officers, and building more shelter beds, though he doesn't say how he would accomplish this. 

    Henderson works at the Washington State Department of Transportation. Previously, he served as an AmeriCorps member with Pierce County Parks and Recreation distributing trees across the region. Henderson's campaign priorities include updating Tacoma's municipal codes to be more equitable and expanding education opportunities for people who want to learn trades. 

    Walker's track record on the council and strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partners makes her the clear choice in this race.

    Kristina Walker

    Deputy Mayor Kristina Walker is running for re-election for At-Large Position 8 on the Tacoma City Council.

  • Endorsed By: Teamsters Joint Council 28, Washington Bikes, Washington Conservation Action, Washington Education Association PAC, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Jamika Scott is running for Tacoma City Council from District 3. She previously ran against Mayor Victoria Woodards in 2021 but lost in the primary election. 

    Scott has worked as a domestic violence advocate at YWCA Pierce County and mentored students with AmeriCorps at Peace Community Center. She is also a co-founder and organizer with the Tacoma Action Collective and a board member with the Tacoma Public Library Foundation Board of Directors. Since her run for mayor, she joined the Tacoma Public Library Foundation board and the Tacoma Arts Commission. 

    Scott is running to bring her lifetime of experience in community activism to the Tacoma City Council. If elected, she would prioritize improving community safety through alternatives to law enforcement. She wants to expand access to mental health advocates to respond to emergency calls instead of police. In addition, she supports utilizing a restorative justice model that attempts to repair the harm done instead of only punishing offenders. 

    Scott is a good choice for Tacoma City Council in District 3 if you're looking for a very progressive candidate with deep roots in the community.

    Last updated: 2023-07-14

    Jamika Scott

    Jamika Scott is running for Tacoma City Council from District 3. She previously ran against Mayor Victoria Woodards in 2021 but lost in the primary election. 

    Jamika Scott is running for Tacoma City Council from District 3. She previously ran against Mayor Victoria Woodards in 2021 but lost in the primary election. 

    Scott has worked as a domestic violence advocate at YWCA Pierce County and mentored students with AmeriCorps at Peace Community Center. She is also a co-founder and organizer with the Tacoma Action Collective and a board member with the Tacoma Public Library Foundation Board of Directors. Since her run for mayor, she joined the Tacoma Public Library Foundation board and the Tacoma Arts Commission. 

    Scott is running to bring her lifetime of experience in community activism to the Tacoma City Council. If elected, she would prioritize improving community safety through alternatives to law enforcement. She wants to expand access to mental health advocates to respond to emergency calls instead of police. In addition, she supports utilizing a restorative justice model that attempts to repair the harm done instead of only punishing offenders. 

    Scott is a good choice for Tacoma City Council in District 3 if you're looking for a very progressive candidate with deep roots in the community.

    Jamika Scott

    Jamika Scott is running for Tacoma City Council from District 3. She previously ran against Mayor Victoria Woodards in 2021 but lost in the primary election.