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  • Christie Robertson

  • Ph.D. Christie Robertson is running to bring inclusive and effective education standards to the district. When her oldest child was diagnosed with a disability, Robertson decided to become a member of the Seattle Special Education PTSA and has served on its executive board for two years. She also has a Ph.D. in Neurobiology and Behavior. 

    Like the other two candidates, Robertson is running to bring a renewed sense of accountability, oversight, and engagement to the school board. Because of her experience in special education advocacy, she has focused on promoting "restorative practices" and supporting the Universal Design for Learning initiative, which aims to use scientific insight into how people learn to create better educational outcomes. She wants to see students with disabilities spend more time in general education classrooms, which she believes will help reduce disparate outcomes for those students. Robertson is also aiming to reduce teacher turnover and improve students' mental health.

    She has the strongest endorsements of any candidate in the race thus far, including the MLK Labor Council and the sole endorsements of the 46th and 43rd Legislative District Democrats. We recommend Robertson because of her endorsements and specific goals for inclusive teaching for all students.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-12

    Christie Robertson

    Ph.D. Christie Robertson is running to bring inclusive and effective education standards to the district. When her oldest child was diagnosed with a disability, Robertson decided to become a member of the Seattle Special Education PTSA and has served on its executive board for two years.

    Ph.D. Christie Robertson is running to bring inclusive and effective education standards to the district. When her oldest child was diagnosed with a disability, Robertson decided to become a member of the Seattle Special Education PTSA and has served on its executive board for two years. She also has a Ph.D. in Neurobiology and Behavior. 

    Like the other two candidates, Robertson is running to bring a renewed sense of accountability, oversight, and engagement to the school board. Because of her experience in special education advocacy, she has focused on promoting "restorative practices" and supporting the Universal Design for Learning initiative, which aims to use scientific insight into how people learn to create better educational outcomes. She wants to see students with disabilities spend more time in general education classrooms, which she believes will help reduce disparate outcomes for those students. Robertson is also aiming to reduce teacher turnover and improve students' mental health.

    She has the strongest endorsements of any candidate in the race thus far, including the MLK Labor Council and the sole endorsements of the 46th and 43rd Legislative District Democrats. We recommend Robertson because of her endorsements and specific goals for inclusive teaching for all students.

    Christie Robertson

    Ph.D. Christie Robertson is running to bring inclusive and effective education standards to the district. When her oldest child was diagnosed with a disability, Robertson decided to become a member of the Seattle Special Education PTSA and has served on its executive board for two years.

  • Apoyadas Por: M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Washington Education Association PAC
  • VOTO APPROVED

    Vote YES for Veterans and Seniors!

  • King County Proposition 1 would extend the Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services Levy. The levy provides funding for public programs in areas such as employment, behavioral health treatment, and housing, and helps connect those resources to seniors, veterans, service members, and military families who need them. 

    First passed in 2006, the original levy only addressed the needs of our community members who have served in the armed forces; however, in 2017, voters approved an updated levy to include our senior neighbors. In the last five years, the levy has helped reduce veteran homelessness by 40 percent, funded 39 senior centers across King County, built more than 200 units of affordable housing for veterans and their families, and launched a 24-hour, multilingual domestic violence hotline. If approved this year, the levy would ensure continued funding for the essential services it has already been delivering and allow the county to respond to the ongoing effects of the pandemic and economic downturn. 

    We all benefit when our local government cares for our neighbors. The Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services levy is a crucial part of our shared security net. Vote "Approved" on King County Proposition 1.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-13

    King County Proposition 1 would extend the Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services Levy. The levy provides funding for public programs in areas such as employment, behavioral health treatment, and housing, and helps connect those resources to seniors, veterans, service members, and military families who need them. 

    First passed in 2006, the original levy only addressed the needs of our community members who have served in the armed forces; however, in 2017, voters approved an updated levy to include our senior neighbors. In the last five years, the levy has helped reduce veteran homelessness by 40 percent, funded 39 senior centers across King County, built more than 200 units of affordable housing for veterans and their families, and launched a 24-hour, multilingual domestic violence hotline. If approved this year, the levy would ensure continued funding for the essential services it has already been delivering and allow the county to respond to the ongoing effects of the pandemic and economic downturn. 

    We all benefit when our local government cares for our neighbors. The Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services levy is a crucial part of our shared security net. Vote "Approved" on King County Proposition 1.

    King County Proposition 1 would extend the Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services Levy. The levy provides funding for public programs in areas such as employment, behavioral health treatment, and housing, and helps connect those resources to seniors, veterans, service members, and military families who need them. 

    First passed in 2006, the original levy only addressed the needs of our community members who have served in the armed forces; however, in 2017, voters approved an updated levy to include our senior neighbors. In the last five years, the levy has helped reduce veteran homelessness by 40 percent, funded 39 senior centers across King County, built more than 200 units of affordable housing for veterans and their families, and launched a 24-hour, multilingual domestic violence hotline. If approved this year, the levy would ensure continued funding for the essential services it has already been delivering and allow the county to respond to the ongoing effects of the pandemic and economic downturn. 

    We all benefit when our local government cares for our neighbors. The Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services levy is a crucial part of our shared security net. Vote "Approved" on King County Proposition 1.

  • Apoyadas Por M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, SEIU 775, SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, The Stranger, Teamsters 117, South King County Professional Firefighters

County Council District Races

Depending on the county district you live in, you may have the following races on your ballot.

  • Jorge Barón is running to bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    Barón plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate organizations around the region on housing and other issues. He believes the county should address disparities in our communities, from providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change to ensuring that everyone can access public transit. 

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that generates outcomes we do not want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld and Poppe on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Given his particular experience, Barón is probably the most distinct candidate in this race. The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón is a great choice if you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader who will bring new perspectives to the King County Council with a record of coalition building and effective advocacy.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-14

    Jorge Barón is running to bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    Barón plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate organizations around the region on housing and other issues. He believes the county should address disparities in our communities, from providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change to ensuring that everyone can access public transit. 

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that generates outcomes we do not want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld and Poppe on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Given his particular experience, Barón is probably the most distinct candidate in this race. The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón is a great choice if you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader who will bring new perspectives to the King County Council with a record of coalition building and effective advocacy.

  • Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting the environment and public health. 

    Reyneveld has worked to help families and children across many volunteer roles, including as a board member of Washington’s Paramount Duty, an organization that advocates for more education funding, and as chair of the Women’s Advisory Board, which makes recommendations to the county for child care access and affordability. Reyneveld has also been a King County Democrats and 36th District Democrats executive board member, and vice chair of the Washington Conservation Action board of directors.

    In our interview with Reyneveld, she pointed to her experience in government and her long track record of advocacy as a sign of her readiness to hit the ground running on her three top priorities: equitable economic recovery, the environment, and housing. With an anticipated budget shortfall looming for the county, she emphasized the need for more progressive revenue for the county to help build 17,000 additional units of housing every year to keep up with population growth. She also mentioned the possibility of a dedicated countywide housing levy, which would create a funding source to build more diverse housing options, from multi-family homes to affordable housing.

    Reyneveld spoke to community safety as an upstream endeavor. She believes that incarceration is not the answer for people struggling with addiction and other health issues. Scaling up gun violence prevention programs and addiction treatment hubs are two policies she would advocate for on the council, and she would also consider policies like guaranteed basic income to help residents thrive. 

    Reyneveld's longtime experience in Democratic politics, community organizations, and legal advocacy distinguish her in this race.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-12

    Sarah Reyneveld

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting the environment and public health. 

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting the environment and public health. 

    Reyneveld has worked to help families and children across many volunteer roles, including as a board member of Washington’s Paramount Duty, an organization that advocates for more education funding, and as chair of the Women’s Advisory Board, which makes recommendations to the county for child care access and affordability. Reyneveld has also been a King County Democrats and 36th District Democrats executive board member, and vice chair of the Washington Conservation Action board of directors.

    In our interview with Reyneveld, she pointed to her experience in government and her long track record of advocacy as a sign of her readiness to hit the ground running on her three top priorities: equitable economic recovery, the environment, and housing. With an anticipated budget shortfall looming for the county, she emphasized the need for more progressive revenue for the county to help build 17,000 additional units of housing every year to keep up with population growth. She also mentioned the possibility of a dedicated countywide housing levy, which would create a funding source to build more diverse housing options, from multi-family homes to affordable housing.

    Reyneveld spoke to community safety as an upstream endeavor. She believes that incarceration is not the answer for people struggling with addiction and other health issues. Scaling up gun violence prevention programs and addiction treatment hubs are two policies she would advocate for on the council, and she would also consider policies like guaranteed basic income to help residents thrive. 

    Reyneveld's longtime experience in Democratic politics, community organizations, and legal advocacy distinguish her in this race.

    Sarah Reyneveld

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting the environment and public health. 

  • King County Budget Manager Becka Johnson Poppe is running to put her budgetary skills and experience to work for the King County Council. She has worked as the UW Director of Policy, Planning & State Operations and as a Budget & Policy Manager with King County. Like Reyneveld, Poppe has held many volunteer roles in the community as well, including as director on the board of youth homelessness advocacy organization YouthCare and serving as a precinct committee officer with the 36th District Democrats.

    Poppe's top three priorities are the environment, equity, and the economy. In our interview with Poppe, she spoke in depth about her work to help oversee half of King County’s $16 billion budget to meet ambitious equity and climate goals. She also said that she would oppose criminalizing homelessness, instead advocating for the houseless as one of the many types of people left behind in the region's uneven prosperity boom. Poppe supports social housing and providing support for first-time homebuyers through a housing levy. 

    Like Baron and Reyneveld, Poppe agreed that the county should seek more mental and behavioral health infrastructure and investments in community courts and other criminal legal alternatives. She said her biggest accomplishment was the development of the county's first-ever Climate Equity Bond, which brought $20 million to frontline communities. 

    Poppe emphasized the environment during her interview. Her plan includes additional investment in accessible, emissions-free transportation like electrifying and expanding the county’s bus and vehicle fleet, providing more green spaces, and working on climate justice in communities most impacted by climate change. She was the only candidate to mention fare-free Metro, both as a way to curb spending on fare enforcement and encourage more riders. Poppe is a good choice If you're looking for a candidate with experience managing large budgets who will prioritize environmental issues.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-25

    Becka Johnson Poppe

    King County Budget Manager Becka Johnson Poppe is running to put her budgetary skills and experience to work for the King County Council. She has worked as the UW Director of Policy, Planning & State Operations and as a Budget & Policy Manager with King County.

    King County Budget Manager Becka Johnson Poppe is running to put her budgetary skills and experience to work for the King County Council. She has worked as the UW Director of Policy, Planning & State Operations and as a Budget & Policy Manager with King County. Like Reyneveld, Poppe has held many volunteer roles in the community as well, including as director on the board of youth homelessness advocacy organization YouthCare and serving as a precinct committee officer with the 36th District Democrats.

    Poppe's top three priorities are the environment, equity, and the economy. In our interview with Poppe, she spoke in depth about her work to help oversee half of King County’s $16 billion budget to meet ambitious equity and climate goals. She also said that she would oppose criminalizing homelessness, instead advocating for the houseless as one of the many types of people left behind in the region's uneven prosperity boom. Poppe supports social housing and providing support for first-time homebuyers through a housing levy. 

    Like Baron and Reyneveld, Poppe agreed that the county should seek more mental and behavioral health infrastructure and investments in community courts and other criminal legal alternatives. She said her biggest accomplishment was the development of the county's first-ever Climate Equity Bond, which brought $20 million to frontline communities. 

    Poppe emphasized the environment during her interview. Her plan includes additional investment in accessible, emissions-free transportation like electrifying and expanding the county’s bus and vehicle fleet, providing more green spaces, and working on climate justice in communities most impacted by climate change. She was the only candidate to mention fare-free Metro, both as a way to curb spending on fare enforcement and encourage more riders. Poppe is a good choice If you're looking for a candidate with experience managing large budgets who will prioritize environmental issues.

    Becka Johnson Poppe

    King County Budget Manager Becka Johnson Poppe is running to put her budgetary skills and experience to work for the King County Council. She has worked as the UW Director of Policy, Planning & State Operations and as a Budget & Policy Manager with King County.

  • Apoyadas Por: SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, The Urbanist, SW Mountain States Regional Council of Carpenters
  • Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-14

    Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is now running for King County Council from District 8. She was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017. Mosqueda previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on worker's rights and children's healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, she supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8.

Otros Candidatos

Sofia Aragon is the other progressive running for King County Council, District 8. Aragon became the first Filipino immigrant to be named mayor of Burien and has served on the Burien City Council since 2020. She is a registered nurse and the executive director of the Washington Center for Nursing. As an attorney, she advocated for healthcare for all and workplace safety in Washington.

Under her mayorship, Burien became the first city in Washington to issue a proclamation against anti-Asian hate and passed a slate of tenant protection laws. She also voted to renew Burien's affordable housing program, although she voted against the initial proposal that would have expanded and improved it.

One notable difference between Aragon and her opponent Mosqueda is their view on policing. Aragon blames efforts to defund the police for Burien's struggles with crime. Although Aragon supports health and social services for people experiencing homelessness, her pledge to "assure an adequate police presence" indicates a more punitive approach to public safety than Mosqueda's.

Disappointingly, Aragon was part of a 4-3 majority on the Burien City Council that removed the Burien Planning Commission chair, Charles Schaefer, for his outreach to people experiencing homelessness in the community. This event generated significant backlash, including the resignation of 11 other members of boards and commissions. At the time of the vote, the City Council had failed to act on King County's offer of $1 million and 35 pallet shelters to create a sanctioned encampment. While Aragon has many good policy positions, her behavior during this recent event should be a major concern for progressive voters. 

Also running in this race is perennial candidate Goodspaceguy, who is not running a serious campaign.

Sofia Aragon

Sofia Aragon is the other progressive running for King County Council, District 8. Aragon became the first Filipino immigrant to be named mayor of Burien and has served on the Burien City Council since 2020.

  • Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016. With his science background, Felleman has pledged to continue supporting environmentally friendly reforms at the port.

    In his time as commissioner, Felleman has focused on fighting climate change and increasing the port's green energy jobs. He has been a leader on the commission when it comes to protecting orcas, publicly opposing the dangerous Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and advocating for well-paying jobs. Elected commission president in 2021, he has recently supported more efficient and greener policies at the port to reduce pollution, including adding solar panels to Fishermen's Terminal's net shed and powering new docks so that ships don't have to idle and burn additional fuel.

    Felleman often supports social causes as well, including condemning Trump's Muslim ban and government agencies’ response at the airport, as well as welcoming Ukranian refugees, with Washington hosting 16,000 refugees, the third most of any state in the U.S.

    Felleman has earned your vote for Port of Seatle, Position #5.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-13

    Fred Felleman

    Enviado por stephanie el Mié, 05/07/2023 - 13:54

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016.

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016. With his science background, Felleman has pledged to continue supporting environmentally friendly reforms at the port.

    In his time as commissioner, Felleman has focused on fighting climate change and increasing the port's green energy jobs. He has been a leader on the commission when it comes to protecting orcas, publicly opposing the dangerous Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and advocating for well-paying jobs. Elected commission president in 2021, he has recently supported more efficient and greener policies at the port to reduce pollution, including adding solar panels to Fishermen's Terminal's net shed and powering new docks so that ships don't have to idle and burn additional fuel.

    Felleman often supports social causes as well, including condemning Trump's Muslim ban and government agencies’ response at the airport, as well as welcoming Ukranian refugees, with Washington hosting 16,000 refugees, the third most of any state in the U.S.

    Felleman has earned your vote for Port of Seatle, Position #5.

    Fred Felleman

    Enviado por stephanie el Mié, 05/07/2023 - 13:54

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5 as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016.

Otros Candidatos

Jesse Tam is the managing director for Mega Pacific Investments, a strategic development consulting firm. He is a former parks commissioner for the city of Newcastle, as well as past president and current board director for the Greater Seattle Chinese Chamber of Commerce, among other roles.

Tam states that he's running to use his business experience to source well-paying union jobs, negotiate business deals, and lead on climate change. While we agree with Tam's listed priorities, Felleman has been an excellent environmental advocate and scientific mind on the board, and we don't see a strong case for how Tam would bring progressive change to the port.

Aaron Todd is the CEO of Airsafe, a site that indexes information on airline safety and flight information for travelers. A former Boeing safety engineer and a U.S. Air Force veteran, Todd has not presented any policy reasons on why he should replace Felleman's deep expertise on the commission.

Jesse Tam

Enviado por stephanie el Mié, 05/07/2023 - 13:54
Jesse Tam is the managing director for Mega Pacific Investments, a strategic development consulting firm. He is a former parks commissioner for the city of Newcastle, as well as past president and current board director for the Greater Seattle Chinese Chamber of Commerce, among other roles.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following city races on your ballot.

  • Maren Costa is the leading progressive candidate running to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan at Amazon that eventually became their official Climate Pledge. In 2020, Costa was illegally fired from the company after sending out an email to rally her coworkers around poor warehouse conditions for workers. With the backing of an open letter from nine U.S. senators, including Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, Costa won her case against Amazon and continued advocating for workers and her community.

    Costa is now running to bring her tenacity and experience in management to city hall. In our interview with Costa, she spoke about the importance of raising more money to maintain services as the city faces a $100 million budget shortfall. Her proposals, including a vacancy tax, were squarely aimed at making the wealthiest pay what they owe to our communities. 

    Costa wants to look out for working people and make Seattle more livable for all. She spoke to a desire to improve affordability by allowing more mixed-use developments and “four floors and corner stores” in neighborhoods. She believes well-designed, denser neighborhoods are critical as the state faces a severe housing shortage, making living here hard for teachers, nurses, and other working professionals. On homelessness, Costa wants the city to take a housing-first approach, working on getting people into secure housing instead of criminalizing them for sleeping outside. On public safety, Costa offers a vision that funds gun violence prevention, community policing, and alternative response models. 

    Costa's experience managing million-dollar budgets and successfully advocating for corporate climate action makes her stand out as a progressive among the top candidates in the district. That experience plus an impressive set of endorsements make her the best choice for Seattle City Council in District 1.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-13

    Maren Costa

    Maren Costa is the leading progressive candidate running to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan at Amazon that eventually became their official Climate Pledge.

    Maren Costa is the leading progressive candidate running to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan at Amazon that eventually became their official Climate Pledge. In 2020, Costa was illegally fired from the company after sending out an email to rally her coworkers around poor warehouse conditions for workers. With the backing of an open letter from nine U.S. senators, including Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, Costa won her case against Amazon and continued advocating for workers and her community.

    Costa is now running to bring her tenacity and experience in management to city hall. In our interview with Costa, she spoke about the importance of raising more money to maintain services as the city faces a $100 million budget shortfall. Her proposals, including a vacancy tax, were squarely aimed at making the wealthiest pay what they owe to our communities. 

    Costa wants to look out for working people and make Seattle more livable for all. She spoke to a desire to improve affordability by allowing more mixed-use developments and “four floors and corner stores” in neighborhoods. She believes well-designed, denser neighborhoods are critical as the state faces a severe housing shortage, making living here hard for teachers, nurses, and other working professionals. On homelessness, Costa wants the city to take a housing-first approach, working on getting people into secure housing instead of criminalizing them for sleeping outside. On public safety, Costa offers a vision that funds gun violence prevention, community policing, and alternative response models. 

    Costa's experience managing million-dollar budgets and successfully advocating for corporate climate action makes her stand out as a progressive among the top candidates in the district. That experience plus an impressive set of endorsements make her the best choice for Seattle City Council in District 1.

    Maren Costa

    Maren Costa is the leading progressive candidate running to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan at Amazon that eventually became their official Climate Pledge.

Otros Candidatos

Preston Anderson

There are 7 other candidates in the crowded race for city council from District 1 this year: Preston Anderson, Rob Saka, Phil Tavel, Jean Iannelli Craciun, Stephen Brown, Mia Jacobson, and Lucy Barefoot.

Preston Anderson

There are 7 other candidates in the crowded race for city council from District 1 this year: Preston Anderson, Rob Saka, Phil Tavel, Jean Iannelli Craciun, Stephen Brown, Mia Jacobson, and Lucy Barefoot.

  • Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to advocate for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Morales has the practical track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-17

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district.

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to advocate for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Morales has the practical track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal progressive advocate for this diverse district.

  • Apoyadas Por: APACE, M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, SEIU Local 925, The Stranger, Teamsters Joint Council 28, The Urbanist, UFCW 3000, Washington Bikes, Washington Education Association PAC, Alliance for Gun Responsibility

Otros Candidatos

Tanya Woo

Chinatown-International District (CID) small business owner Tanya Woo is the leading challenger to Morales for Seattle City Council from District 2. Her family ran the Mon Hei Bakery and later renovated the historic Louisa Hotel to have 84 units of workforce housing. 

Tanya Woo

Chinatown-International District (CID) small business owner Tanya Woo is the leading challenger to Morales for Seattle City Council from District 2. Her family ran the Mon Hei Bakery and later renovated the historic Louisa Hotel to have 84 units of workforce housing. 

  • Alex Hudson is running to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing. Since 2018, she has served as Executive Director of the Transportation Choices Coalition, where she successfully advocated for $5 billion in investments in transportation and transit in the 2022 state legislative session, including ushering in free rides for all youth in Washington. Hudson currently serves on Puget Sound Regional Council Transportation Policy Board and the board of the Freeway Park Association and has also led the First Hill Improvement Association.

    In our interview with Hudson, she offered her perspective as a renter and presented a detailed vision for the city that she hopes would alleviate the housing crisis. In comparison to Hollingsworth, Hudson was very specific in our interview about policies that she believes will affect housing across the entire city, not just the district. As a board member of Bellwether Housing, the largest affordable housing provider in King County, Hudson spoke to how they needed two years to get through permitting, licensing, and review to build housing - not fast enough, in her opinion. Hudson opposes the urban village model and exclusionary zoning, two policies that limit housing and stifle affordable and middle housing, like duplexes, in wealthier neighborhoods. She supports a municipal capital gains tax to invest more in affordable housing and implement the social housing authority to kickstart social, publicly-owned housing in Seattle.

    On community safety and policing, Hudson believes that after one of the greatest civil rights protests of our time, the city has dropped the ball on how to continue to make our communities safe for all. Like Hollingsworth, Hudson sees value in covering some of the basics - making sure street lights work and parks are full of programs and opportunities. In addition, she wants to ensure that armed officers are showing up only on appropriate calls and that fare enforcement is restricted so that people don't end up in the criminal legal system over a bus fare. Hudson also wants to see further investment in a functioning 911 alternative responder. It is worth noting here that both Hudson and Hollingsworth answered 'maybe' to The Seattle Times' questionnaire about conducting sweeps and raising the JumpStart tax on big corporations to cover Seattle's budget shortfall of about $100 million.

    Hudson would be an excellent choice for voters seeking a highly knowledgeable and experienced leader in transportation and housing issues.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-20

    Alex Hudson

    Alex Hudson is running to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing.

    Alex Hudson is running to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing. Since 2018, she has served as Executive Director of the Transportation Choices Coalition, where she successfully advocated for $5 billion in investments in transportation and transit in the 2022 state legislative session, including ushering in free rides for all youth in Washington. Hudson currently serves on Puget Sound Regional Council Transportation Policy Board and the board of the Freeway Park Association and has also led the First Hill Improvement Association.

    In our interview with Hudson, she offered her perspective as a renter and presented a detailed vision for the city that she hopes would alleviate the housing crisis. In comparison to Hollingsworth, Hudson was very specific in our interview about policies that she believes will affect housing across the entire city, not just the district. As a board member of Bellwether Housing, the largest affordable housing provider in King County, Hudson spoke to how they needed two years to get through permitting, licensing, and review to build housing - not fast enough, in her opinion. Hudson opposes the urban village model and exclusionary zoning, two policies that limit housing and stifle affordable and middle housing, like duplexes, in wealthier neighborhoods. She supports a municipal capital gains tax to invest more in affordable housing and implement the social housing authority to kickstart social, publicly-owned housing in Seattle.

    On community safety and policing, Hudson believes that after one of the greatest civil rights protests of our time, the city has dropped the ball on how to continue to make our communities safe for all. Like Hollingsworth, Hudson sees value in covering some of the basics - making sure street lights work and parks are full of programs and opportunities. In addition, she wants to ensure that armed officers are showing up only on appropriate calls and that fare enforcement is restricted so that people don't end up in the criminal legal system over a bus fare. Hudson also wants to see further investment in a functioning 911 alternative responder. It is worth noting here that both Hudson and Hollingsworth answered 'maybe' to The Seattle Times' questionnaire about conducting sweeps and raising the JumpStart tax on big corporations to cover Seattle's budget shortfall of about $100 million.

    Hudson would be an excellent choice for voters seeking a highly knowledgeable and experienced leader in transportation and housing issues.

    Alex Hudson

    Alex Hudson is running to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing.

  • Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. She is a small business owner, former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University, and former Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program. Hollingsworth is currently part of the Food Access Network at Northwest Harvest. She has invested much of her time in community and agriculture. Her family owns and operates one of the few Black-owned cannabis production farms in the state.

    In our interview with Hollingsworth, she pointed to her lifelong history and knowledge of the district as a strength. Though she does not have extensive policy experience, she would bring a wealth of community knowledge and priorities to the seat. For example, she spoke about how Black-owned businesses in the Central District had long been overlooked. She would push for greater investments from Seattle’s Business Improvement Areas and Office of Economic Development. She pointed out that the 98118 zip code in Rainier Valley only had one food bank, which hampered residents' ability to put food on the table in difficult times. She would also seek more youth enrichment programs and equitable placement of parks and green spaces by looking for opportunities for both in the district.

    Compared to Hudson's campaign, Hollingsworth's is more locally focused, with a desire to improve youth activities and parks specifically in the district. When it comes to policing, she stated that police should make more of an effort to meet the community, a stance we feel could use more detail.  She also supports Mayor Harrell's plan to hire 400 more cops, which will likely prove challenging during a nationwide shortage of officers and would do little to address the root causes of crime. 

    Hollingsworth would be an excellent choice for voters looking for a candidate with strong community ties who would be a powerful advocate for District 3 at city hall.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-20

    Joy Hollingsworth

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. She is a small business owner, former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University, and former Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program.

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. She is a small business owner, former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University, and former Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program. Hollingsworth is currently part of the Food Access Network at Northwest Harvest. She has invested much of her time in community and agriculture. Her family owns and operates one of the few Black-owned cannabis production farms in the state.

    In our interview with Hollingsworth, she pointed to her lifelong history and knowledge of the district as a strength. Though she does not have extensive policy experience, she would bring a wealth of community knowledge and priorities to the seat. For example, she spoke about how Black-owned businesses in the Central District had long been overlooked. She would push for greater investments from Seattle’s Business Improvement Areas and Office of Economic Development. She pointed out that the 98118 zip code in Rainier Valley only had one food bank, which hampered residents' ability to put food on the table in difficult times. She would also seek more youth enrichment programs and equitable placement of parks and green spaces by looking for opportunities for both in the district.

    Compared to Hudson's campaign, Hollingsworth's is more locally focused, with a desire to improve youth activities and parks specifically in the district. When it comes to policing, she stated that police should make more of an effort to meet the community, a stance we feel could use more detail.  She also supports Mayor Harrell's plan to hire 400 more cops, which will likely prove challenging during a nationwide shortage of officers and would do little to address the root causes of crime. 

    Hollingsworth would be an excellent choice for voters looking for a candidate with strong community ties who would be a powerful advocate for District 3 at city hall.

    Joy Hollingsworth

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. She is a small business owner, former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University, and former Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sage Leaders, UFCW 3000

Otros Candidatos

Bobby Goodwin

There are six other candidates in the race for Seattle City Council from District 3. Andrew Ashiofu's name may be familiar to voters, as he ran last year for state Legislature.

Bobby Goodwin

There are six other candidates in the race for Seattle City Council from District 3. Andrew Ashiofu's name may be familiar to voters, as he ran last year for state Legislature.

  • Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive advocate for affordable housing, community safety, and more. Davis served on the Roosevelt Neighborhood Association and has been a board member at Futurewise, which advocates for sustainability and livable communities. In our interview with Davis, he emphasized that he's running to be the opposite of retiring incumbent council member Alex Pedersen, who stood in the way of many progressive policies, including efforts to build more "missing middle" housing.

    Davis would focus on housing supply, subsidizing housing so that everyone has more affordable access, and increasing stability for renters. Many policies are on the table for Davis to achieve this, including prohibiting rent price gouging, funding social housing, expanding mid-rise housing, ensuring the "right to return" for people displaced by developers, and offering square footage and height bonuses. Davis is also rigorously pro-science when it comes to treating homelessness as a housing problem. He points out that many challenging and displacing life events like domestic abuse, addiction, and job loss are less catastrophic when people can afford rent and stay off the streets. Aside from the many housing policies above, Davis would push to build 3,500 permanent supportive housing units. 

    Davis is one of the few candidates - not just in the district, but citywide - to acknowledge that even Seattle's own police don't think they can hire 400 more officers during a nationwide shortage. Rather than lowering standards on hires and pouring more money into bonuses, he wants to see aggressive expansion into alternatives to policing for people in crisis. Other top priorities for Davis are worker's rights, including subsidized childcare, closing minimum wage loopholes, and more.

    Vote for Ron Davis for progressive change on the Seattle City Council from District 4.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-13

    Ron Davis

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive advocate for affordable housing, community safety, and more.

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive advocate for affordable housing, community safety, and more. Davis served on the Roosevelt Neighborhood Association and has been a board member at Futurewise, which advocates for sustainability and livable communities. In our interview with Davis, he emphasized that he's running to be the opposite of retiring incumbent council member Alex Pedersen, who stood in the way of many progressive policies, including efforts to build more "missing middle" housing.

    Davis would focus on housing supply, subsidizing housing so that everyone has more affordable access, and increasing stability for renters. Many policies are on the table for Davis to achieve this, including prohibiting rent price gouging, funding social housing, expanding mid-rise housing, ensuring the "right to return" for people displaced by developers, and offering square footage and height bonuses. Davis is also rigorously pro-science when it comes to treating homelessness as a housing problem. He points out that many challenging and displacing life events like domestic abuse, addiction, and job loss are less catastrophic when people can afford rent and stay off the streets. Aside from the many housing policies above, Davis would push to build 3,500 permanent supportive housing units. 

    Davis is one of the few candidates - not just in the district, but citywide - to acknowledge that even Seattle's own police don't think they can hire 400 more officers during a nationwide shortage. Rather than lowering standards on hires and pouring more money into bonuses, he wants to see aggressive expansion into alternatives to policing for people in crisis. Other top priorities for Davis are worker's rights, including subsidized childcare, closing minimum wage loopholes, and more.

    Vote for Ron Davis for progressive change on the Seattle City Council from District 4.

    Ron Davis

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive advocate for affordable housing, community safety, and more.

Otros Candidatos

Maritza Rivera

Davis faces several less progressive candidates in this race for Seattle City Council in District 4. Maritza Rivera works in Mayor Bruce Harrell's office as Deputy Director of the Department of Arts & Culture.

Maritza Rivera

Davis faces several less progressive candidates in this race for Seattle City Council in District 4. Maritza Rivera works in Mayor Bruce Harrell's office as Deputy Director of the Department of Arts & Culture.

  • Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program. She also serves as the advocacy chair on John Rogers Elementary's PTA and volunteered to coach middle schoolers who were learning English. As a daughter of Iranian immigrants who were undocumented during her childhood, Jenks is motivated to improve life for immigrant families in a sanctuary city like Seattle.

    Jenks' main area of advocacy has been gun safety. After the Parkland school shooting, she helped organize a gun buyback program and education campaign for gun owners in California, where she lived at the time.

    When it comes to public safety more broadly, Jenks' vision includes safety for everyone - from kids walking and biking to school, to people who live in tents and cars. She supports funding programs like LEAD and CoLEAD that provide behavioral health and community support as an alternative to police. While she does not support the mayor's proposed goal of reaching 1,400 officers, she said in her interview that she would support 1,200. She reportedly said it was a mistake for the previous council to commit to defunding police by 50%.

    When it comes to housing, Jenks thinks the current mandatory affordable housing model does not go far enough, as most landlords can choose to pay a fee instead of creating affordable units. Jenks wants to expand mandatory affordable housing into more neighborhoods and increase zoning and incentives for multi-family homes, which will provide more options for lower and mid-income families. She knocked on doors for the social housing initiative and says she is excited to hear about ideas for how to fund it with progressive revenue. She also mentioned racial justice when it comes to housing - proposing support to help people of color buy homes or afford childcare as a form of reparations.

    Jenks is also passionate about protecting our climate. She wants to bring carbon-free electrification, higher standards for green buildings, and expanded public transit to our neighborhoods. Many of the changes in her climate plan will also make our neighborhoods more walkable, and give residents in Lake City and Bitter Lake an easier commute to the light rail.

    Although some of the other candidates have slightly more ambitious plans for housing and police reform, Jenks has a strong platform and has earned the most progressive endorsements in this race. We recommend Nilu Jenks for Seattle City Council from District 5.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-14

    Nilu Jenks

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program.

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program. She also serves as the advocacy chair on John Rogers Elementary's PTA and volunteered to coach middle schoolers who were learning English. As a daughter of Iranian immigrants who were undocumented during her childhood, Jenks is motivated to improve life for immigrant families in a sanctuary city like Seattle.

    Jenks' main area of advocacy has been gun safety. After the Parkland school shooting, she helped organize a gun buyback program and education campaign for gun owners in California, where she lived at the time.

    When it comes to public safety more broadly, Jenks' vision includes safety for everyone - from kids walking and biking to school, to people who live in tents and cars. She supports funding programs like LEAD and CoLEAD that provide behavioral health and community support as an alternative to police. While she does not support the mayor's proposed goal of reaching 1,400 officers, she said in her interview that she would support 1,200. She reportedly said it was a mistake for the previous council to commit to defunding police by 50%.

    When it comes to housing, Jenks thinks the current mandatory affordable housing model does not go far enough, as most landlords can choose to pay a fee instead of creating affordable units. Jenks wants to expand mandatory affordable housing into more neighborhoods and increase zoning and incentives for multi-family homes, which will provide more options for lower and mid-income families. She knocked on doors for the social housing initiative and says she is excited to hear about ideas for how to fund it with progressive revenue. She also mentioned racial justice when it comes to housing - proposing support to help people of color buy homes or afford childcare as a form of reparations.

    Jenks is also passionate about protecting our climate. She wants to bring carbon-free electrification, higher standards for green buildings, and expanded public transit to our neighborhoods. Many of the changes in her climate plan will also make our neighborhoods more walkable, and give residents in Lake City and Bitter Lake an easier commute to the light rail.

    Although some of the other candidates have slightly more ambitious plans for housing and police reform, Jenks has a strong platform and has earned the most progressive endorsements in this race. We recommend Nilu Jenks for Seattle City Council from District 5.

    Nilu Jenks

    Nilu Jenks is a community advocate entering the crowded race to represent District 5 on Seattle's City Council. Jenks is a board member of Roosevelt Alumni for Racial Equity, where she wrote the racial equity curriculum for Roosevelt High's after-school program.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sage Leaders, SEIU 775, Teamsters Joint Council 28, The Urbanist, UFCW 3000, King County Democrats
  • ChrisTiana ObeySumner

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner is a social equity consultant, educator, and advocate. They have worked in permanent supportive housing as a service coordinator and assessor, and currently run their own equity consulting firm.

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner is a social equity consultant, educator, and advocate. They have worked in permanent supportive housing as a service coordinator and assessor, and currently run their own equity consulting firm.

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner is a social equity consultant, educator, and advocate. They have worked in permanent supportive housing as a service coordinator and assessor, and currently run their own equity consulting firm.

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner is a social equity consultant, educator, and advocate. They have worked in permanent supportive housing as a service coordinator and assessor, and currently run their own equity consulting firm.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • Tye Reed

    Tye Reed is the operations director at Real Change News and the co-founder (and current co-chair) of the House Our Neighbors coalition.

    Tye Reed

    Tye Reed is the operations director at Real Change News and the co-founder (and current co-chair) of the House Our Neighbors coalition.

    Tye Reed

    Tye Reed is the operations director at Real Change News and the co-founder (and current co-chair) of the House Our Neighbors coalition.

    Tye Reed

    Tye Reed is the operations director at Real Change News and the co-founder (and current co-chair) of the House Our Neighbors coalition.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sage Leaders
  • Cathy Moore

    Former King County Superior Court Judge Cathy Moore is another candidate in this crowded race. Moore has worked in public service for decades, including as a public defender, as chair of the Seattle Human Rights Commission, and as governor of the Washington State Bar Association.

    Cathy Moore

    Former King County Superior Court Judge Cathy Moore is another candidate in this crowded race. Moore has worked in public service for decades, including as a public defender, as chair of the Seattle Human Rights Commission, and as governor of the Washington State Bar Association.

    Cathy Moore

    Former King County Superior Court Judge Cathy Moore is another candidate in this crowded race. Moore has worked in public service for decades, including as a public defender, as chair of the Seattle Human Rights Commission, and as governor of the Washington State Bar Association.

    Cathy Moore

    Former King County Superior Court Judge Cathy Moore is another candidate in this crowded race. Moore has worked in public service for decades, including as a public defender, as chair of the Seattle Human Rights Commission, and as governor of the Washington State Bar Association.

  • Apoyadas Por: Alliance for Gun Responsibility

Otros Candidatos

They are six more candidates competing for retiring Councilmember Debra Juarez's District 5 seat.

Shane Macomber is a payee coordinator at a behavioral health care service agency and a local real estate broker. Macomber also filed as a city council candidate in 2013. If elected, he wants to work on developing housing density around transit centers, improving job training and placement programs, expanding Seattle’s P-Patch programs to respond to food deserts, and investing in public infrastructure to improve livability and affordability for the growing Seattle population. However, when asked about his position on rent control, criminalizing addiction, and expanding the police staff, Macomber did not offer progressive solutions. Further, Macomber lacks elected and community leadership experience, and he has yet to receive endorsements from key progressive leaders and organizations in this race.

Justin Simmons has a long history in Seattle and its organizations. He is a four-term past president of the Metropolitan Democratic Club of Seattle and a past president of the Church Council of Greater Seattle. He served six years on the executive board of the 46th District Democrats, is an elected precinct committee officer in the 32nd Legislative District, has served on the Young Democrats of Washington Executive Board, and is a co-founder of the Progressive Democratic Caucuses of WA. Unfortunately, Simmons policy priorities include support for failed tactics like moving people experiencing homelessness from one area to another, and restricting more affordable types of homes from wealthy neighborhoods. 

Lucca Murdoch Howard is an 18-year-old candidate who is currently a student at North Seattle College. He is also a board member of the Aurora Reimagined Coalition, an organization set on re-envisioning the corridor's function and purpose. As a passionate transit advocate, Howard wants the Department of Transportation to plant more trees, widen sidewalks, and more along the corridor, while soliciting further community input on the design. He also wants to see parks within 15 minutes of every Seattleite, and funding for the social housing initiative paid for by a vacancy tax.

Rebecca Williamson also ran for Seattle City Council in 2021, and like this year also raised no money nor published a campaign platform.

Shane Macomber

They are six more candidates competing for retiring Councilmember Debra Juarez's District 5 seat.

  • Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the District 6 seat on the Seattle City Council. Strauss was first elected in 2019, and he previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. Now, he is running for a second term to continue bringing community-focused leadership to District 6.

    On the council, Strauss has prioritized creating more affordable housing options and strengthening tenant rights. With investments of $250 million in 2022, permanent supportive housing was purchased in Green Lake, Ballard, and Greenwood. As the land use chair, he also points to how he has cleared encampments without sweeps by connecting people to services. Unfortunately, Strauss recently voted in favor of allowing Republican City Attorney Ann Davison to prosecute people for drug use. In addition, Strauss disappointed many advocates by pushing for larger police budgets, which would increase the presence of militarized police in our communities instead of making us safer. 

    If re-elected, Strauss will continue to develop Ballard Commons Park as a community green space, support the local small business economy, and ensure corporations and the wealthy pay what they owe. While he has not been the progressive leader some had hoped for, all of his viable opponents would be a step backward for the district and the city overall. Strauss has earned the majority of endorsements from progressive leaders and organizations and is the clear choice for city council from District 6.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-17

    Dan Strauss

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the District 6 seat on the Seattle City Council. Strauss was first elected in 2019, and he previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility.

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the District 6 seat on the Seattle City Council. Strauss was first elected in 2019, and he previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. Now, he is running for a second term to continue bringing community-focused leadership to District 6.

    On the council, Strauss has prioritized creating more affordable housing options and strengthening tenant rights. With investments of $250 million in 2022, permanent supportive housing was purchased in Green Lake, Ballard, and Greenwood. As the land use chair, he also points to how he has cleared encampments without sweeps by connecting people to services. Unfortunately, Strauss recently voted in favor of allowing Republican City Attorney Ann Davison to prosecute people for drug use. In addition, Strauss disappointed many advocates by pushing for larger police budgets, which would increase the presence of militarized police in our communities instead of making us safer. 

    If re-elected, Strauss will continue to develop Ballard Commons Park as a community green space, support the local small business economy, and ensure corporations and the wealthy pay what they owe. While he has not been the progressive leader some had hoped for, all of his viable opponents would be a step backward for the district and the city overall. Strauss has earned the majority of endorsements from progressive leaders and organizations and is the clear choice for city council from District 6.

    Dan Strauss

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the District 6 seat on the Seattle City Council. Strauss was first elected in 2019, and he previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility.

Otros Candidatos

Shea Wilson

There are five other candidates in the running for Seattle City Council from District 6. Pete Hanning owned Red Door in Fremont for twenty years and is currently the executive director for the Fremont Chamber of Commerce.

Shea Wilson

There are five other candidates in the running for Seattle City Council from District 6. Pete Hanning owned Red Door in Fremont for twenty years and is currently the executive director for the Fremont Chamber of Commerce.

  • Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, where he worked on the Seattle Human Rights Commission. He also serves as the president of the Seattle Metropolitan Park District where he has worked to create jobs, ensure the cleanliness of public green space, and advance environmental goals for the city.

    In his first term on the council, Lewis prioritized funding affordable housing programs, ensuring community safety, and achieving greater climate protections to make Seattle a healthier place for all of us. He secured funding to fully renovate the Queen Anne Community Center and expanded the JustCARE program, which offers outreach, shelter, and wrap-around services to Seattleites without housing. In this race, he is running on a progressive platform to expand crisis support services, invest in social and transitional housing options, and improve the city’s public transit infrastructure to reduce both traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Lewis has earned an impressive list of endorsements from elected officials and key community leaders and is the most progressive choice in this race. Vote Andrew Lewis for Seattle City Council from District 7.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-17

    Andrew Lewis

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, where he worked on the Seattle Human Rights Commission.

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, where he worked on the Seattle Human Rights Commission. He also serves as the president of the Seattle Metropolitan Park District where he has worked to create jobs, ensure the cleanliness of public green space, and advance environmental goals for the city.

    In his first term on the council, Lewis prioritized funding affordable housing programs, ensuring community safety, and achieving greater climate protections to make Seattle a healthier place for all of us. He secured funding to fully renovate the Queen Anne Community Center and expanded the JustCARE program, which offers outreach, shelter, and wrap-around services to Seattleites without housing. In this race, he is running on a progressive platform to expand crisis support services, invest in social and transitional housing options, and improve the city’s public transit infrastructure to reduce both traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Lewis has earned an impressive list of endorsements from elected officials and key community leaders and is the most progressive choice in this race. Vote Andrew Lewis for Seattle City Council from District 7.

    Andrew Lewis

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, where he worked on the Seattle Human Rights Commission.

Otros Candidatos

Isabelle Kerner

Andrew Lewis faces five challengers in this race. Isabelle Kerner, a self-employed private investigator, unsuccessfully ran for the District 7 seat in 2019.

Isabelle Kerner

Andrew Lewis faces five challengers in this race. Isabelle Kerner, a self-employed private investigator, unsuccessfully ran for the District 7 seat in 2019.

No Hay Recomendación

There are many concerning issues in Seattle Public Schools that need to be addressed in the years to come. There's a looming budget crisis, partially fueled by the recession and increasing costs. With a fatal shooting at Ingraham High School, declining enrollment, and a new education model to implement, Seattle voters have an opportunity to make a difference with their vote for school board director this year.

In times such as these, the school board would benefit from some stability and institutional knowledge. However, the unpaid and high-pressure position of school board director in Seattle has had high turnover, with most incumbents staying only one term. As of right now, the longest-serving incumbents on the ballot have been in office for four years.

No matter who is elected this year in school board positions, the board members must wrestle with difficult changes as they reckon with the budget, bringing special education and highly capable students into general education classrooms, and continuing work on equity.

Voters have two reasonable choices between Liza Rankin, the incumbent, and Debbie Carlsen, to be the District 1 Director on the Seattle School Board. Please read the full comparison below to find the candidate who best fits your values and priorities for Seattle schools. 

Voters have a clear but difficult choice in District 1. Liza Rankin, the incumbent, and Debbie Carlsen are the leading candidates in this race to be the District 1 Director on the Seattle School Board. Please read the full comparison below to find the candidate who best fits your values and priorities for Seattle schools.
  • Incumbent Liza Rankin was elected in 2019 and took office shortly before the chaos of the pandemic hit our schools. Prior to her election, Rankin was a longtime community organizer and artist who had served on the PTA of her children's school as well as on the board of the Seattle Council PTSA and the advisory board at Sand Point Arts and Cultural Exchange at Magnuson Park, among other leadership roles. Rankin began her school activism by bringing food to teachers walking picket lines during the 2015 strike. She ran on a vision to support the school board's new Strategic Plan and ensure that every child has equitable access and opportunity to learn.

    In our extensive interview with Rankin, she reiterated that the board had made excellent progress on those issues, including reducing disproportionate discipline against boys and students of color, banning isolation practices, and limiting restraints. She noted that progress had been made on inclusionary practices for students with disabilities, moving the city's public schools from the bottom quartile to the bottom half nationwide. Rankin is running again to continue this work, but also to address head-on the issues facing students and schools. 

    We found Rankin to be clear-eyed on the issue of the budget. She told us without equivocation that any one-time fixes have run out and expenditures are higher than state revenue provides. Rankin told us that in the last 8 years, 10 schools had opened, and a mismatch of schools open and students who actually attend mean the school closures are likely one of the ways to close the budget gap. For example, she stated that 15 elementary schools have fewer than 250 students and the district could save money on administration and provide better opportunities for students if they were added to larger schools.

    Rankin noted that an upgrade to school lock security would be complete in Seattle Public Schools soon, and outside of that, Carlsen and Rankin were somewhat similar on school safety. 

    Rankin is a good choice if you're looking for someone with institutional knowledge to serve during a challenging time for our schools. 

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-17

    Liza Rankin

    Incumbent Liza Rankin was elected in 2019 and took office shortly before the chaos of the pandemic hit our schools.

    Incumbent Liza Rankin was elected in 2019 and took office shortly before the chaos of the pandemic hit our schools. Prior to her election, Rankin was a longtime community organizer and artist who had served on the PTA of her children's school as well as on the board of the Seattle Council PTSA and the advisory board at Sand Point Arts and Cultural Exchange at Magnuson Park, among other leadership roles. Rankin began her school activism by bringing food to teachers walking picket lines during the 2015 strike. She ran on a vision to support the school board's new Strategic Plan and ensure that every child has equitable access and opportunity to learn.

    In our extensive interview with Rankin, she reiterated that the board had made excellent progress on those issues, including reducing disproportionate discipline against boys and students of color, banning isolation practices, and limiting restraints. She noted that progress had been made on inclusionary practices for students with disabilities, moving the city's public schools from the bottom quartile to the bottom half nationwide. Rankin is running again to continue this work, but also to address head-on the issues facing students and schools. 

    We found Rankin to be clear-eyed on the issue of the budget. She told us without equivocation that any one-time fixes have run out and expenditures are higher than state revenue provides. Rankin told us that in the last 8 years, 10 schools had opened, and a mismatch of schools open and students who actually attend mean the school closures are likely one of the ways to close the budget gap. For example, she stated that 15 elementary schools have fewer than 250 students and the district could save money on administration and provide better opportunities for students if they were added to larger schools.

    Rankin noted that an upgrade to school lock security would be complete in Seattle Public Schools soon, and outside of that, Carlsen and Rankin were somewhat similar on school safety. 

    Rankin is a good choice if you're looking for someone with institutional knowledge to serve during a challenging time for our schools. 

    Liza Rankin

    Incumbent Liza Rankin was elected in 2019 and took office shortly before the chaos of the pandemic hit our schools.

  • Apoyadas Por: OneAmerica Votes, The Stranger, King County Democrats, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Challenging Rankin this year is Debbie Carlsen, a consultant, former NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Washington Interim Policy Director, and co-founder and executive director of LGTBQ Allyship. She serves as advocacy chair of both the Olympic Hills Elementary PTA board and the 46th Democrats as a Co-Policy & Advocacy Chair, as well as fundraising chair for the National Women’s Political Caucus.

    As a nonbinary person with a diverse family, Carlsen wants schools to be welcoming to all, especially in a climate of conservatives passing anti-LGTBQ laws. Though she does not have much detail available on her website, Carlsen lists transparency, family engagement, and representation in schools as her top three policy priorities. In her interview with the 36th Legislative District Democrats, she also emphasized robust special education and regaining the confidence of Seattle parents and families.

    On the issue of the budget, Carlsen was hesitant to say that closures were inevitable. Closures in the past have been disastrous, she said, and more community meetings would need to happen in District 1 before she made a decision. She proposed a 15 percent cut to staff in the central office, though it seems very unlikely that this alone would cover a budget gap of this magnitude. 

    On school safety, Carlsen and Rankin were somewhat similar. Both agreed that students had been clear that more surveillance and policing in schools was not the way forward, and both felt that gun violence education and community lobbying for better gun violence legislation were needed. Carlsen felt that directors could and must do more to meet with community members and parents, especially right after the tragedy at Ingraham.

    If voters are looking for an experienced advocate hoping to bring change and improve transparency for parents and students, Carlsen could be a good choice.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-13

    Debbie Carlsen

    Challenging Rankin this year is Debbie Carlsen, a consultant, former NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Washington Interim Policy Director, and co-founder and executive director of LGTBQ Allyship.

    Challenging Rankin this year is Debbie Carlsen, a consultant, former NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Washington Interim Policy Director, and co-founder and executive director of LGTBQ Allyship. She serves as advocacy chair of both the Olympic Hills Elementary PTA board and the 46th Democrats as a Co-Policy & Advocacy Chair, as well as fundraising chair for the National Women’s Political Caucus.

    As a nonbinary person with a diverse family, Carlsen wants schools to be welcoming to all, especially in a climate of conservatives passing anti-LGTBQ laws. Though she does not have much detail available on her website, Carlsen lists transparency, family engagement, and representation in schools as her top three policy priorities. In her interview with the 36th Legislative District Democrats, she also emphasized robust special education and regaining the confidence of Seattle parents and families.

    On the issue of the budget, Carlsen was hesitant to say that closures were inevitable. Closures in the past have been disastrous, she said, and more community meetings would need to happen in District 1 before she made a decision. She proposed a 15 percent cut to staff in the central office, though it seems very unlikely that this alone would cover a budget gap of this magnitude. 

    On school safety, Carlsen and Rankin were somewhat similar. Both agreed that students had been clear that more surveillance and policing in schools was not the way forward, and both felt that gun violence education and community lobbying for better gun violence legislation were needed. Carlsen felt that directors could and must do more to meet with community members and parents, especially right after the tragedy at Ingraham.

    If voters are looking for an experienced advocate hoping to bring change and improve transparency for parents and students, Carlsen could be a good choice.

    Debbie Carlsen

    Challenging Rankin this year is Debbie Carlsen, a consultant, former NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Washington Interim Policy Director, and co-founder and executive director of LGTBQ Allyship.

  • Ph.D. Christie Robertson is running to bring inclusive and effective education standards to the district. When her oldest child was diagnosed with a disability, Robertson decided to become a member of the Seattle Special Education PTSA and has served on its executive board for two years. She also has a Ph.D. in Neurobiology and Behavior. 

    Like the other two candidates, Robertson is running to bring a renewed sense of accountability, oversight, and engagement to the school board. Because of her experience in special education advocacy, she has focused on promoting "restorative practices" and supporting the Universal Design for Learning initiative, which aims to use scientific insight into how people learn to create better educational outcomes. She wants to see students with disabilities spend more time in general education classrooms, which she believes will help reduce disparate outcomes for those students. Robertson is also aiming to reduce teacher turnover and improve students' mental health.

    She has the strongest endorsements of any candidate in the race thus far, including the MLK Labor Council and the sole endorsements of the 46th and 43rd Legislative District Democrats. We recommend Robertson because of her endorsements and specific goals for inclusive teaching for all students.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-12

    Christie Robertson

    Ph.D. Christie Robertson is running to bring inclusive and effective education standards to the district. When her oldest child was diagnosed with a disability, Robertson decided to become a member of the Seattle Special Education PTSA and has served on its executive board for two years.

    Ph.D. Christie Robertson is running to bring inclusive and effective education standards to the district. When her oldest child was diagnosed with a disability, Robertson decided to become a member of the Seattle Special Education PTSA and has served on its executive board for two years. She also has a Ph.D. in Neurobiology and Behavior. 

    Like the other two candidates, Robertson is running to bring a renewed sense of accountability, oversight, and engagement to the school board. Because of her experience in special education advocacy, she has focused on promoting "restorative practices" and supporting the Universal Design for Learning initiative, which aims to use scientific insight into how people learn to create better educational outcomes. She wants to see students with disabilities spend more time in general education classrooms, which she believes will help reduce disparate outcomes for those students. Robertson is also aiming to reduce teacher turnover and improve students' mental health.

    She has the strongest endorsements of any candidate in the race thus far, including the MLK Labor Council and the sole endorsements of the 46th and 43rd Legislative District Democrats. We recommend Robertson because of her endorsements and specific goals for inclusive teaching for all students.

    Christie Robertson

    Ph.D. Christie Robertson is running to bring inclusive and effective education standards to the district. When her oldest child was diagnosed with a disability, Robertson decided to become a member of the Seattle Special Education PTSA and has served on its executive board for two years.

  • Apoyadas Por: M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Washington Education Association PAC

Otros Candidatos

Google manager and parent of two Ben Gitenstein describes himself as a frustrated progressive who doesn't have all the answers but is willing to ask hard questions. His website details his concerns with Seattle Public Schools and its board, including budgets and the shooting at Ingraham High that left one student dead. Unfortunately, he does not yet offer potential solutions to these issues as of mid-July other than bringing in new voices, which will naturally happen as there are two retiring incumbents this year. 

Gitenstein was the executive director of the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance in the 2000s and has volunteered for school plays and fundraisers, but he does not appear to be actively involved in any school leadership positions like the PTA. His recommendation by The Seattle Times was based on what the editorial board describes as his urgency on school issues, "his appetite for real talk," and his distance from anyone who currently works with or in Seattle Public Schools. Based on local interviews, Gitenstein is definitely interested in fiscal oversight and addressing the enrollment drop, and voters looking for an outsider perspective might find a candidate in Gitenstein. 

A parent of three Seattle Public Schools kids, independent documentary filmmaker Evan Briggs says she's running to bring meaningful change and big-picture thinking as a director for District 3. She has served as chair of the parent-teacher organization at her children’s elementary school and is currently the Sand Point Elementary PTA representative on the Magnuson Park Advisory Committee.

Briggs wants to see more mental health professionals in schools as well as stronger relationships with service organizations in the community. She also states that the board should have clearer communication with parents and allow insight and access into the budget for families. On the budget, Briggs has stated that she will look to pare down administrative and consulting contracts that don't affect student performance. She's endorsed by retiring school board director Chandra Hampson, progressive King County Councilmember Girmay Zahilay, and Seattle School Board President Brandon Hersey.

We agree with Briggs' priorities, though we hope to see more detail from her campaign if she moves to the general election.

Ben Gitenstein

Google manager and parent of two Ben Gitenstein describes himself as a frustrated progressive who doesn't have all the answers but is willing to ask hard questions.

  • Gina Topp is running for the open seat vacated by incumbent Leslie Harris, who isn't running for re-election. She is the chief legal counsel and policy advisor to King County Executive Dow Constantine and served on the boards of the 34th Legislative District Democrats and the Seattle Sports Complex Foundation. 

    Like other candidates for school board this year, Topp's platform listed on her website is somewhat vague. If elected, she aims to cultivate a safe and welcoming environment for all students, empower educators, and engage parents. In her interview with The Seattle Times, Topp stated that her plan for the budget crisis is to advocate for more money from the Legislature - an idea that incumbent Liza Rankin has said was unlikely to succeed because of the recent increase in funding already coming from the state.

    Despite this, we believe that Topp has the strongest experience of the available candidates for this seat. She has two opponents on the primary ballot. Rosie McCarter describes herself as a neurodivergent, two-spirit mom of three, and a proud Cherokee and Joseph's band of Nez Perce. She states that as a parent ambassador and peer educator, she wants to tackle the district's budget crisis without making cuts to vital programs, though she does not say where cuts would be made or where additional revenue will come from. She also states that all students, regardless of income, should receive free meals, that systemic racism in schools must be addressed, and that the highly capable program needs fixes. However, she offers no additional information on her website about how she would accomplish this. 

    The other candidate is Maryanne Wood, who does not appear to have education advocacy experience. She states that her childhood on a dairy farm made her value hard work, and she has six grandchildren in the district. Wood's top message is "no to school closures," and she also says that she will "dial back the mega schools that are already planned at Alki, Rogers, and Montlake."

    Topp's experience and progressive endorsements make her the best choice in District 1 for Seattle School Board Director.

    Ultima actualización 2023-07-17

    Gina Topp

    Gina Topp is running for the open seat vacated by incumbent Leslie Harris, who isn't running for re-election.

    Gina Topp is running for the open seat vacated by incumbent Leslie Harris, who isn't running for re-election. She is the chief legal counsel and policy advisor to King County Executive Dow Constantine and served on the boards of the 34th Legislative District Democrats and the Seattle Sports Complex Foundation. 

    Like other candidates for school board this year, Topp's platform listed on her website is somewhat vague. If elected, she aims to cultivate a safe and welcoming environment for all students, empower educators, and engage parents. In her interview with The Seattle Times, Topp stated that her plan for the budget crisis is to advocate for more money from the Legislature - an idea that incumbent Liza Rankin has said was unlikely to succeed because of the recent increase in funding already coming from the state.

    Despite this, we believe that Topp has the strongest experience of the available candidates for this seat. She has two opponents on the primary ballot. Rosie McCarter describes herself as a neurodivergent, two-spirit mom of three, and a proud Cherokee and Joseph's band of Nez Perce. She states that as a parent ambassador and peer educator, she wants to tackle the district's budget crisis without making cuts to vital programs, though she does not say where cuts would be made or where additional revenue will come from. She also states that all students, regardless of income, should receive free meals, that systemic racism in schools must be addressed, and that the highly capable program needs fixes. However, she offers no additional information on her website about how she would accomplish this. 

    The other candidate is Maryanne Wood, who does not appear to have education advocacy experience. She states that her childhood on a dairy farm made her value hard work, and she has six grandchildren in the district. Wood's top message is "no to school closures," and she also says that she will "dial back the mega schools that are already planned at Alki, Rogers, and Montlake."

    Topp's experience and progressive endorsements make her the best choice in District 1 for Seattle School Board Director.

    Gina Topp

    Gina Topp is running for the open seat vacated by incumbent Leslie Harris, who isn't running for re-election.

  • Apoyadas Por: OneAmerica Votes, The Stranger, Washington Education Association PAC, Alliance for Gun Responsibility